Appying for a U.S Visa with Fraud Convictions.

Travel Forums North America Appying for a U.S Visa with Fraud Convictions.

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1. Posted by AJH90210 (Budding Member 11 posts) 5w Star this if you like it!

So I am currently in the process of renewing my passport, it expired in 2007 and I have not been on holiday anywhere since 2002.

I am applying for my U.S visa for one reason and one reason alone, to go on holiday(s) to Orlando again.

But all this research on applying for a U.S visa, ACRO reports, ACRO reports with no Live trace and VCU1 forms, well it all sounds very confusing and intimidating and that is not even taking into account the Embassy interview in London.

my fraud convictions (several but told all count as 1, as from same court case) are almost 5 years old now (in December anyway)

The result of this was Community service, a fine and 12 months community order (which ended up getting cut to 6 months)

have a few other slight cautions all around 10+ years old.

I would appreciate advice for people with conviction who applied for U.S visas, to offer me much advice and hints and tips

and if they had issues with the ACRO report and if areas said no live trace.

Thank you, any advice or knowledge would be welcomed.

p.s also when I was looking at the ACRO website for the police certificate, for things you will need it says

4. Colour copies of your passport(s) / travel document / official photographic identity document.

My question is, surely you do not need to have a holiday booked and planned before applying for your ACRO ??

I am obviously very worried I would never get a Visa, so would not want to be booking or planning any Orlando trips unless I got a Visa.

2. Posted by Borisborough (Moderator 1044 posts) 5w Star this if you like it!

First things first - should we assume that you're a British citizen with a UK passport? This is implicit from what you state but actually very important and not actually stated explicitly.

3. Posted by AndyF (Moderator 1136 posts) 5w Star this if you like it!

Quoting AJH90210

4. Colour copies of your passport(s) / travel document / official photographic identity document.

My question is, surely you do not need to have a holiday booked and planned before applying for your ACRO ??

I read that as meaning passport or national ID card rather than say a flight ticket. Not very clearly worded.

4. Posted by AJH90210 (Budding Member 11 posts) 5w Star this if you like it!

Quoting Borisborough

First things first - should we assume that you're a British citizen with a UK passport? This is implicit from what you state but actually very important and not actually stated explicitly.

Yes born and lived in UK all my life.

5. Posted by AJH90210 (Budding Member 11 posts) 5w Star this if you like it!

Quoting AndyF

Quoting AJH90210

4. Colour copies of your passport(s) / travel document / official photographic identity document.

My question is, surely you do not need to have a holiday booked and planned before applying for your ACRO ??

I read that as meaning passport or national ID card rather than say a flight ticket. Not very clearly worded.

Ok thanks, it kinda sounded like I have to have a holiday booked in order to actually apply for the ACRO.

6. Posted by leics2 (Respected Member 347 posts) 5w Star this if you like it!

>Ok thanks, it kinda sounded like I have to have a holiday booked in order to actually apply for the ACRO.

You certainly don't need to have a holiday booked. In fact, as you realised, booking a holiday before being granted a US visa would be foolish. The US embassy in the UK website actually says:

>If you require a visa, we recommend that you apply well in advance of your intended travel date and do not make non-refundable travel arrangements until you have been issued a visa and are in receipt of your passport.

The 'travel document' mentioned simply means an official document which could be used to travel abroad. UK citizens don't have anything but passports for that purpose but other countries/citizenships do.

> I would appreciate advice for people with conviction who applied for U.S visas, to offer me much advice and hints and tips

I'm afraid the experience of others can have no relevance to what your experience will be. Decisions are made by the officer who interviews you on the day and are based on your individual circumstances. There isn't a 'one size fits all' approach. Visa rules, guidelines and processes can and do change, sometimes very quickly indeed.

As you have been convicted of a 'crime of moral turpitude' (fraud) within the past 5 years, and had received cautions before that (the US does not recognise the legal 'clean slates' which can sometimes be granted by other countries for old convictions), it is my opinion that you are very unlikely to be recommended for a visa. Depending on the exact details of your crime/s, your personal circumstances and answers you give at interview you may be recommended for a 'waiver of ineligibility'. This process can take several months to complete (the embassy website suggests 6-8 months). Although there is no guarantee that a waiver of ineligibility (and thus a visa) will be granted the fact that an officer recommends you for one is a good sign.

The only advice I can give is to be courteous, honest and open at your interview. The impression you make on the interviewing officer really is important.

Good luck! :-)

7. Posted by AJH90210 (Budding Member 11 posts) 5w Star this if you like it!

Perhaps I should wait slightly longer to apply for the Visa, but I am desperate to find out.

If I waited until December, it would be 5 years since it happened, right now about 4.5 years since the convictions.

I hope they care about how you have changed since. Since the convictions I have Volunteered for Charity for almost 5 years and I work for Probation services.

meaning I could get good character references also.

From a lot of people's own stories I have heard the best advice is to go to Belfast rather than London, and dress in a suit.

I have heard of people getting accepted for a Visa with Drug convictions and some with Jail time, so I am slightly optimistic.

8. Posted by AndyF (Moderator 1136 posts) 5w Star this if you like it!

I have heard people say they think 5 years is the sweet spot for being granted a waiver. If you have no pressing need, it could be worth waiting another six months before applying. But I'm only speculating.

My other thought is, why bother, when there are so many more interesting places to travel who don't put you through all this rigmarole.

9. Posted by AJH90210 (Budding Member 11 posts) 5w Star this if you like it!

Honestly, there is no where else I want to go, doesn't interest me at all

apart from going back to Malta one day, but nothing ever compared to my Orlando hols

been 9 times before, but not since 2002.

10. Posted by leics2 (Respected Member 347 posts) 5w Star this if you like it!

>I have heard the best advice is to go to Belfast rather than London,

People sometimes go to Belfast (not cheap when you factor in the cost of travel and probably at least one overnight stay) because their guidance about the time for processing waivers of ineligibility is 2-3 months as opposed to London's 6-8. They don't go because Belfast is any more flexible or less strict than London: both places work to exactly the same rules & guidelines.

I doubt wearing a suit makes any real difference. Looking really scruffy might do (depending on the individual's circumstances and the officer concerned) so it's sensible to dress as smartly as one would for any other formal interview. But just wearing a suit won't get you a visa if the circumstances don't meet the guidelines and/or your interview answers don't meet the officer's requirements.

[ Edit: Edited on 14-Jul-2018, at 13:24 by leics2 ]