1. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1031 posts) 6w Star this if you like it!

I've always wanted to visit the Galapogos ever since I read "The Voyage of the Beagle". I suggested going there with one of my grandsons, but I think his parents didn't want him scuba diving alone with me at that age (he was 13) so we went on a Med cruise instead. I was talking to my son and daughter-in-law and I told them the things that I would still like to see (like I wrote in one of the other threads where someone said that Antarctica could be done), I asked how much freedom their daughter Imy granddaughter) would have to travel with me, and my daughter-in-law said our granddaughter was the assistant manager now and had to work weekends, but that I could take her. So after I go on the next two cruises this summer, and have a breast reduction and a hip replacement, they would like to travel with me for 2 weeks in the fall of 2020. I am not prepared for this, as I had thought I would never get to go there. So is there any possibility of a trip to the Galapagos for someone who is mobility impaired? I don't think I should dive anymore although I might manage to snorkel. (ALthough I know the water is cold) And my son tends to get seasick (he takes after my dad).

[ Edit: Edited on 28-May-2019, at 00:08 by greatgrandmaR ]

2. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1031 posts) 6w Star this if you like it!

I think a small ship will work best for me. So what is the difference between a northern route and a southern (or western route)?

3. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 250 posts) 6w Star this if you like it!

RosalieAnn,

Have you looked into "ecuadorforall" yet? They specialize in all sorts of services (planning, consulting, transport, tours) for people with mobility issues. They may even provide transport to and around the islands via boat as well as land tours.

[ Edit: Edited on 28-May-2019, at 17:57 by road to roam ]

4. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1031 posts) 6w Star this if you like it!

Not yet - thanks

5. Posted by kparma (Budding Member 3 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

A lot of time you will be hiking on rough coral, which can be difficult for someone with mobility issues. Also, getting from the boat into and out of the dingy can be challenging, especially if the sea is rough

6. Posted by ToonSarah (Travel Guru 942 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

Quoting kparma

A lot of time you will be hiking on rough coral, which can be difficult for someone with mobility issues. Also, getting from the boat into and out of the dingy can be challenging, especially if the sea is rough

Yes, a few of the landings can be a little difficult. It would depend what help you can rely on from your travelling companions, but it would also be worth talking to the tour company in advance to discuss your needs. Some islands are easier to land on than others, for instance, so that might dictate your route. Also, some boats have bigger crews than others, so more help might be available, although in my experience only the guide lands with you - the rest of the crew are there to look after the boat, prepare meals etc. You'll also want to ask about accessibility on board - the small boat we went on, the Angelito, had steep narrow companionways, so a larger ship might be better for you.

In terms of choosing a route, it's not as simple as 'north versus south'. Cruises vary in length - the longer ones are naturally more expensive but allow time to visit some of the further flung islands which I found the most interesting - Espanola, for example. And each island has specific appeal. What I did was read about each island, decide on some I really wanted to try to include, and then try to find a cruise that covered them all. That proved impossible, unless we were to do a two week cruise which was beyond our budget, but I found a seven night cruise covering all but one. You might like to read my blog entry with all the background to our cruise: https://toonsarahvt.travellerspoint.com/79/. As I wrote there, I have read that like us, everyone agonises over their choice of itinerary, and everyone has a wonderful time regardless of where they decide to go – there are no bad itineraries when it comes to Galápagos cruises!

Given the mobility challenges you might face, another option would be to consider a land-based holiday. You would still see quite a lot, especially if you managed some day trips by boat. Staying on Santa Cruz, for example, you could see the giant tortoises and some other classic Galápagos animals and birds without leaving the island, and could organise a couple of boat trips from the harbour at Puerto Ayora where you might have a chance to look at the boats before deciding on how you would get on in them.

I know you don't use a wheelchair as a matter of course, but the disability advice here could be useful: https://www.voyagers.travel/galapagoscruise-travelblog/discovering-the-galapagos-in-a-wheelchair/. A Google search will throw up other similar ones.

Do PM me if you have questions about specific islands and if we visited them I'll do my best to help :)

[ Edit: Edited on 01-Jul-2019, at 16:33 by ToonSarah ]