Early December Trip to Italy

Travel Forums Europe Early December Trip to Italy

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11. Posted by nickjonas4267 (Budding Member 10 posts) 1y 1 Star this if you like it!

December is very cold in Italy, with sporadic rainfall; nevertheless, it is the best time to visit this part of the world as most of the tourist’s spots are isolated. There are a plethora of historic places in Italy and Rome tops the list with Coliseum, The Doge's Palace, Herculaneum, Hadrian's Villa, Colosseum, Pompeii, and Leaning Tower of Pisa.

12. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 1434 posts) 1y 2 Star this if you like it!

Nickjonas4267:

1. December is very cold in Italy,

Italy is most certainly not 'very cold' in comparison with many other European countries. 'Very cold' is purely a matter of personal perception.

2. most of the tourist’s spots are isolated

That is not true. Rome (like London, Paris and many other European cities) is a year-round tourist destination. Rome has tens of thousands of visitors throughout the winter months.

3. There are a plethora of historic places in Italy and Rome tops the list with Coliseum, The Doge's Palace, Herculaneum, Hadrian's Villa, Colosseum, Pompeii, and Leaning Tower of Pisa.

That sentence makes no sense at all. The only historical site from that list which can be found in Rome is the Colosseum.

13. Posted by nickjonas4267 (Budding Member 10 posts) 49w Star this if you like it!

leics2

1) Thanks for the reply leics2, and I concur with the fact that 'Very cold' is subjective. But my 70 year old Grandfather found it extremely cold. However the temperature varies from place to place. 13 degrees is cold, and December’s in Italy is certainly not warm.

2) "most of the tourist’s spots are isolated."

The common perception of Italy is that of a summer destination, and perhaps the best time to visit. Therefore, fewer crowd is expected during those months when compared to summers. Maybe 'Isolated' is the wrong choice of word.

3) This was a response to 'Early December Trip to Italy'. Hence, the reply wasn't isolated to Rome.

14. Posted by Roscoe G (First Time Poster 1 posts) 49w 2 Star this if you like it!

I LOVE Italy at this time of the year. Yes there will be rain yes some days will be a chilly. The trade offs are totally worth it.

The crowds are gone. Cafes are full of people who live there and are not sick of tourists. Museums are easier to visit. The cool misty evenings are romantic.

We are farmers so this is when we travel and we love it. Just take nice long underwear and layers. You will be fine. We saw Venice in snow one December and it was just amazing.

I say go, go

Happy Trails,
Randy

15. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 1434 posts) 49w Star this if you like it!

nickjonas4267:

>Hence, the reply wasn't isolated to Rome.

My comment was nothing to do with whether your reply was restricted (not 'isolated') to Rome. The construction of your sentence, as posted, means that all the sights and sites you listed are in Rome. Your sentence is extremely misleading, which is why I commented.

>The common perception of Italy is that of a summer destination

That may be the 'common perception' where you and/or your grandfather live (where is that?) but it is most certainly not the 'common perception' in other places.

Major Italian cities, in particular, are extremely popular year-round destinations, both for other Europeans and for travellers from further afield. The idea that 'most of the tourist spots are isolated' (I think you mean 'empty'?) is simply wrong. As RoscorG says, the summer crowds are largely gone in the winter months (except for Christmas and New Year) but there are still plenty of visitors.

And for people living in the UK, any of the more northerly European countries....and even Greece or Turkey..... 13C may feel a bit chilly but it's certainly not 'cold'! :-)

[ Edit: Edited on 29-Aug-2019, 18:21 GMT by leics2 ]

16. Posted by Borisborough (Moderator 1526 posts) 49w Star this if you like it!

28-31 Dec 2017 - needed coats and long trousers in Venice. 1-4 Jan 2018 needed coats and long trousers in San Marino. 5-8 Jan 2018 needed jacket in Florence but shorts were fine in Pisa. 9-13 Jan 2018 shorts and t-shirt in Rome except for a day in the Vatican when it poured down.

So, winter weather in Italy - variable - plan for the worst, hope for the best. :):)

17. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1720 posts) 49w Star this if you like it!

I think that the word isolated was used in a different way than I would have used it to mean that there were less people visiting than there would be in the summer. My daughter visited Venice in the winter and some of the time it was flooded. I'd agree to split between two cities, but personally I'd want to do Rome and Venice if that were possible.

18. Posted by spiritbohemian (Inactive 5 posts) 49w Star this if you like it!

I'am also going Italy next month and everyone is saying don't forget to take your umbrella with you. it would be good i think.

19. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 1434 posts) 49w Star this if you like it!

I certainly wouldn't bother taking an umbrella to Italy in September. A light waterproof jacket with a hood is a much, much better choice.

The chances of experiencing any rain in September are still pretty low and, frankly, umbrellas are a real nuisance in cities and useless if it's windy.

If it does rain and you're really desperate for an umbrella you can just buy a cheap one from the street-sellers who will 'magically' appear with umbrellas whenever it rains, calling 'Brello! Brello!'....and there are, of course, umbrellas on sale in Italian shops. Street-sellers and other places also sell plastic hooded capes which are excellent for 'emergency' use. :-)

[ Edit: Edited on 31-Aug-2019, 07:38 GMT by leics2 ]

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