Burma / Myanmar

Travel Forums Asia Burma / Myanmar

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1. Posted by janamanda3 (Budding Member 3 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Hello

I am off to Myanma with my hubby for a month in Feb. We want to travel inland and also head to the beaches too.

I'm at the beginning of planning the trip at the moment so im looking for

ideas/ backpacker trails / Places I must not miss / really cool places to stay / experiences / best routes to travel / if your vegan and happen to know of anywhere not to miss

If you have any advice on any of these I would be most grateful

Thank you, Janine????

2. Posted by Andrew Mack (Travel Guru 996 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Hi Janine, a little info on your profile helps contributors tailor their responses a bit better.
I would suggest you keep an eye on this (or your homeland equivalent depending upon where you're from/based) It's not 'gospel' but another info feed ; https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/myanmar

I can only respond 2nd hand as I haven't visited there yet...
But a vegetarian friend visited in 2017 and his comments mean IIRC;
I believe vegetarian isn't too difficult there as a fair portion of their cuisine is vegetables, however there may be some dishes which appear to be vegetables but they're cooked in a meat stock. The idea of not eating meat (except for religious reasons) is rather alien in countries where poverty means any food is food and they can't be picky about it.
IIRC there's a phrase they use which means 'No Living Thing' and refer to vegetarian food.
I can't remember the local term... maybe 'thatyo'...

[ Edit: Edited on 14-Aug-2019, 12:44 GMT by Andrew Mack ]

3. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 321 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Andrew, you are correct about the term, but for a vegan it should be from no living thing.

The OP is asking for vegan places. Generally, a vegan will not eat anything derived from an animal, whether that animal was slaughtered in the process of obtaining the food or not. So eggs, dairy and even honey are often avoided by a vegan.

I think that must be difficult to adhere to outside of countries
- UK and US, for example - that make being a vegan a little easier by labeling products that are suitable for vegans and where vegan restaurants can be found.

[ Edit: Edited on 14-Aug-2019, 15:04 GMT by road to roam ]

4. Posted by Andrew Mack (Travel Guru 996 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Quoting road to roam

Andrew, you are correct about the term, but for a vegan it should be from no living thing.

Thanks. As I mentioned, it's a friend who mentioned it.
I'm quite impressed with myself that I got it so close.

Quoting road to roam

The OP is asking for vegan places.

Yes I understand what Vegan is, but as my friend was a vegetarian I could only give very limited advice from that perspective.

Personally I really don't understand why anyone is vegetarian let alone vegan, but some people are because they're privileged enough to have that choice.

5. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 878 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

The Happy Cow Myanmar listings should be helpful:

https://www.happycow.net/asia/myanmar/

6. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 321 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Quoting Andrew Mack

Personally I really don't understand why anyone is vegetarian let alone vegan, but some people are because they're privileged enough to have that choice.

It seems very limiting, whatever the reason - being a flexivore has to be easier and I'd guess some vegan and vegetarian travelers, depending on where they are, must turn to that from time to time.

On a different note, I must avoid some foods made strictly for vegans and vegetarians because they occasionally use tahini as an emulsifier and I am allergic to that (sesame).

[ Edit: Edited on 14-Aug-2019, 16:34 GMT by road to roam ]

7. Posted by AndyF (Moderator 1690 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Quoting Andrew Mack

Personally I really don't understand why anyone is vegetarian let alone vegan, but some people are because they're privileged enough to have that choice.

And then there are people who are veggie because they're poor, where meat is an unknown privilege.

I know someone from the UK who is a veggie by choice, for reasons of economy - eating veggie is cheaper and this choice allows her to afford to travel.

As for not understanding, Andrew have you never felt strongly about something on principle? I entirely get why some people would not want to eat animals.

8. Posted by Andrew Mack (Travel Guru 996 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

I understand why many don't eat much meat, but being a complete vegetarian seems like a very odd way to save money. Actually I can't see that it does especially save money any more than a 'rarely eat meat but not a vegetarian' person would.

I have very firm principles about many things, but being a Vegetarian or Vegan really doesn't make sense to me.

9. Posted by Tabithag (Full Member 134 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Myanmar is a lovely country, as long as you are happy to spend much of your time seeing Buddhas and temples. Bagan was a real highlight, in particular the balloon flight, which may need to be booked in advance. I know that the Moon Restaurant (Be Kind to Animals) there is vegan friendly, and had great food. Mandalay and nearby Inwa was good, Inle Lake was interesting but very touristy. I liked the Kawgun Caves near Monywa, but they may be difficult to get to if you are not either driving or with a tour. We didn't do beaches, but did pass through Dawei, which may be the kind of place you are looking for.

10. Posted by Borisborough (Moderator 1343 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

We were there a few years ago and had a few days at a beach at the end. Directly west from Yangon is Ngwesaung on the coast. There are a few hotels there (we didn't need to book in advance at the time) and there's a direct return bus from the western bus station in Yangon.