Crazy Airport Parking Rates

Travel Forums Off Topic Crazy Airport Parking Rates

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71. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 1026 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

Vague again...

That's the Civil Nuclear Constabulary. Unless things have changed, men and women in this force are routinely armed while on patrol.

[ Edit: Edited on 23-Aug-2019, 12:55 GMT by road to roam ]

72. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 2306 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

Did a bit of research and have edited my last post to answer your question. :-)

Like the vast, vast majority of the population I'd never even heard of the CNC. If I ever happened to get near to one of their patrolled sites and saw an armed officer I'd just assume he/she was a firearms officer on a job (which, in effect, he/she is).

[ Edit: Edited on 23-Aug-2019, 13:00 GMT by leics2 ]

73. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 1026 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

Quoting leics2

Hence my comment about airports being the only places you'll regularly see armed officers on patrol.

You never said "places you'll regularly see armed officers on patrol" prior to now - whether you see them or not doesn't really matter. Why make that distinction now?

[ Edit: Edited on 23-Aug-2019, 13:34 GMT by road to roam ]

74. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 2306 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

I said: >UK airports are the only place in the country where there are armed police on patrol as a norm.

I was referring to ordinary everyday police in ordinary, everyday places rather than the separate, specialised, CNC and Ministry of Defence police who patrol specialist sites.

I had thought that would be obvious but I do apologise for any lack of clarity. The nit has been fully-picked.

The CNC, as opposed to e.g the British Transport Police, simply do not figure in our ordinary, everyday lives. Neither do the Ministry of Defence police, who patrol sundry MOD installations. Unlike airport-based armed police, who can and do just wander past when you're checking-in, browsing duty-free or eating your Wetherspoons breakfast, you'd have to actively seek out the locations which are patrolled by those specialist forces.

So let me make my previous comment more accurate:

Armed police officers (i.e. ordinary, everyday, common-or-garden police, albeit authorised firearms officers) patrol UK airports, airside and landside, every day. So airports are only place you'll see armed police patrolling on a regular basis unless you make a special trip to one of the few nuclear or MOD sites which have their own, specialist, armed police forces on their own sites.

I do hope that clarifies. :-)

[ Edit: Edited on 23-Aug-2019, 14:52 GMT by leics2 ]

75. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 1026 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

Quoting leics2

I do hope that clarifies.

It does.

Really, not to nitpick at all, rather to correct a grossly inaccurate statement like "UK airports are the only place in the country where there are armed police on patrol as a norm." I hope you understand?

The field of LE (law enforcement) is of particular interest to me and as such that statement really needed to be clarified - and I'm glad you did it. ;)

[ Edit: Edited on 23-Aug-2019, 15:35 GMT by road to roam ]

76. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 2306 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

A linguistic issue again and most certainly not a 'gross inaccuracy'. It seems your understanding of the everyday phrase 'armed police' is not the same as those of us who live in the UK and that's which is fair enough. I'll try to explain:

'Armed police' here means 'ordinary, everyday police who are armed'. In everyday usage, the phrase does not, and would not be assumed to, include the specialist and separate MOD and CNC police. We'd call them the 'MOD police' and 'the CNC', just as we generally call the British Transport Police by their full title. All three are designated 'special police forces' and are the responsibility of the relevant government department rather than of the Home Office, which is responsible for our 'territorial police forces' (i.e. 'the police').

Those of us in the UK would understand the meaning of the phrase I used. I'm now aware that it's another linguistic variant I might need to clarify on international forums.

[ Edit: Edited on 23-Aug-2019, 15:41 GMT by leics2 ]

77. Posted by AndyF (Moderator 2247 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

I do hope you lot aren't bickering. :)

78. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 2306 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

I'm def not. Just defending myself via explanation after an accusation of 'gross inaccuracy' . :-)

[ Edit: Edited on 23-Aug-2019, 17:32 GMT by leics2 ]

79. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 1026 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

Quoting leics2

'Armed police' here means 'ordinary, everyday police who are armed'. In everyday usage, the phrase does not, and would not be assumed to, include the specialist and separate MOD and CNC police. We'd call them the 'MOD police' and 'the CNC', just as we generally call the British Transport Police by their full title. All three are designated 'special poli

I do see where you're coming from - I fully anticipated the literal noun definition of "police" (the civil force of a national or local government) rather than a colloquialism. Considering the proper definition it can be easy for some to think any police force, which is still how that general term "armed police" reads.

[ Edit: Edited on 23-Aug-2019, 18:27 GMT by road to roam ]

80. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 2306 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

Not really a colloquialism, just another potential linguistic difference of which I will, on this site, be fully aware in future.

[ Edit: Edited on 23-Aug-2019, 19:23 GMT by leics2 ]

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