photography tips

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1. Posted by peterhales (First Time Poster 1 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

what should i take care when take potos

2. Posted by Bennytheball (Budding Member 47 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

It depends in which country you are travelling with your camera, many people don't like having their picture taken for many diverse reasons, also in the less developed countries it's illegal to film police in uniforms, police stations, military bases, and sea ports, this can land you in a lot of trouble, even in jail, with allegations of being a spy levelled against you.

Some older men and women in Morocco also detest having their picture taken, there is an ancient belief that a camera can steal the soul, so if trying this expect much wailing and waving of arms in attempts to stop you!

The best pictures are obtained when the sun is overhead at its highest around noon to avoid deep side shadows spoiling your photographs, if there is no sun it will not matter so much but the picture will lack detail. Try to avoid using the flash facility, it will alert people in the immediate vicinity to your camera and sometimes aggrieved locals might try to snatch the camera in angry response, this particularly applies to subjects being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

A large expensive camera is unsuitable for covert filming, I find my Fuji compact and Motorola smartphone are my best companions and for filming street opportunities with the subjects being unaware of the presence of a camera I use my tiny 808 keyring camera to good effect as in this instance in the mean streets of Marrakesh.......

https://www.travellerspoint.com/photos/stream/photoID/4632695/users/Bennytheball/

3. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1275 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

Except for the idea that deep shadows spoil a photo, I agree with the above. Photographing buildings and scenery like the Grand Canyon you need shadows from the sun to give a sense of scale and depth.

Photographing people you should avoid the sun - pictures in light shade will be more flattering. If you photograph people when the sun is behind you, they will be looking into the sun and will be squinting. Also when photographing people check to see that there is nothing distracting in the back ground - you don't want telephone poles coming out of their heads.

4. Posted by Teoni (Travel Guru 791 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

A lot of pocket digital cameras I find over expose photos taken on overcast days. Not much you can do about it except try not to take too many pictures with sky in the background. When taking scenery pictures try and find an interesting focal point. Using drones check the laws of the countries you are visiting. Do not harass wildlife to get a shot. If you visit Qatar don't take pictures of the oil fields.

5. Posted by ToonSarah (Travel Guru 1033 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

I agree with all of the above, but it's possible with many compacts to get around any over-exposure issues:

Quoting Teoni

A lot of pocket digital cameras I find over expose photos taken on overcast days. Not much you can do about it except try not to take too many pictures with sky in the background.

by choosing to over-ride the standard setting and under-expose by half or a whole stop.

I also recommend learning about depth of field. A shallow depth of field blurs the background and is great for portraits, wildlife, sculptures and any photo where you want a single subject to stand out. The opposite is true of landscapes etc where you want everything to be in focus. You achieve shallow depth of field by opening up the aperture and/or using a long zoom - and again, even many compact cameras have a setting to adjust it when in semi-automatic mode.

[ Edit: Edited on 06-Oct-2019, 10:51 GMT by ToonSarah ]

6. Posted by Teoni (Travel Guru 791 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Quoting ToonSarah

I agree with all of the above, but it's possible with many compacts to get around any over-exposure issues:

Quoting Teoni

A lot of pocket digital cameras I find over expose photos taken on overcast days. Not much you can do about it except try not to take too many pictures with sky in the background.

by choosing to over-ride the standard setting and under-expose by half or a whole stop.

I have tried that and sometimes it is just what it needs other times it will make the subject matter too dark so you end up losing detail in the subject matter. I guess in the end it is all about compromise.

7. Posted by ToonSarah (Travel Guru 1033 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Quoting Teoni

Quoting ToonSarah

I agree with all of the above, but it's possible with many compacts to get around any over-exposure issues:

Quoting Teoni

A lot of pocket digital cameras I find over expose photos taken on overcast days. Not much you can do about it except try not to take too many pictures with sky in the background.

by choosing to over-ride the standard setting and under-expose by half or a whole stop.

I have tried that and sometimes it is just what it needs other times it will make the subject matter too dark so you end up losing detail in the subject matter. I guess in the end it is all about compromise.

Or sort exposure issues in post-editing, if they're not too severe.

8. Posted by Dymphna (Full Member 179 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

When and where possible, use a tripod. This one tool will make your pictures so much better. I speak as one who does product photography professionally. The difference between on and off a tripod is great.

9. Posted by Beausoleil (Travel Guru 1240 posts) 1w 1 Star this if you like it!

When I see an overexposure coming, I move the camera around until the exposure looks right and then push the button halfway to set the exposure. Then, holding the button down to keep the exposure, I get the subject I'm trying to take in the viewfinder where I want it. That helps avoid overexposure on cloudy or even excessively sunny days.

10. Posted by khaledb (Budding Member 10 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

It's important to ask yourself first, Does it worth taking a photo? You know photos are the memories of the coming days. Try to have good memories.

Considering types of Cameras, I can agree with Dymphna in having a tripod. ;)
''Before you raise your camera, see where the light is coming from, and use it to your advantage''

[ Edit: Edited on 12-Oct-2019, 15:58 GMT by khaledb ]