photography tips

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11. Posted by forevertrips (Budding Member 7 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

Some tips I can share based on my experience:
-Always prepare a waterproof case
-You can already set the temperature/contrast before going to a city so you would have one tone for your album.
-Bring a small tripod. Sometimes you just want to take a photo but no one is actually there to take it.

12. Posted by karazyal (Travel Guru 3684 posts) 2y 1 Star this if you like it!

Are you a fast runner

While you are positioning yourself for the "best shot" be aware of who is around you!

When you are preoccupied with setting up your shot be careful someone is not jockeying around to snatch your camera! Even watch for some kid who can grab it and run fast! Some tourists wander around with expensive cameras and smartphones worth more than a local makes all year working long hours at labor intensive occupations.

All of those beautiful photos you had taken can be gone in a few seconds! Every now and then save your photos in case something happens. (Even something so simple as leaving a camera on a bus or in a taxi.)

Okeydokey.

13. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 2079 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

I do save my photos to my computer every night and put them in folders by the day. Then I write a journal entry (in the past on paper - now in email) using the photos I have to job my memory. Otherwise I lose track.

Beausoleil's trick with the exposure is one I use also now that I am using a digital camera. It is easier than setting the exposure like I had to do on my film camera.

But, I have to say I disagree with several of the answers here.

I do not have a tripod - well I should say that I have a tripod but I do not use it and never carry it on a trip. I have been taking photos since at least 1948 and I have done without a tripod for that length of time. My father taught me how to hold a camera still (and for film cameras the longest exposure where I could probably be successful at doing that) and I can usually get creative with using objects around me to hold the camera steady.

Two reasons not to carry a tripod - One is that if something is not physically attached to me in some way, I will lose it by leaving it someplace. That may be particular to me, but maybe not. The other reason is that right now, I can only move myself - I can't carry anything at all unless it is strapped to me somehow. My camera is heavy and wearing it is hard on the arthritis in my neck so I wear it on a vest that takes the weight off my neck. It would also make it harder for someone to snatch. But there is a limit to the number of things I can have strapped to me - a hat, my camera, a water bottle and my passport case is about all that will work for me.

I also disagree about waiting to ask if the photo is worth taking. Especially now with digital cameras - my idea is take the photo first and think about it after. It doesn't cost anything (we no longer have to pay for film and then for developing the film), and if you stop and think you may miss the picture. If you don't want it, you can delete it and it doesn't cost anything.

14. Posted by ToonSarah (Travel Guru 1377 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

Quoting karazyal

Are you a fast runner

While you are positioning yourself for the "best shot" be aware of who is around you!

When you are preoccupied with setting up your shot be careful someone is not jockeying around to snatch your camera! Even watch for some kid who can grab it and run fast! Some tourists wander around with expensive cameras and smartphones worth more than a local makes all year working long hours at labor intensive occupations.

This happened to friends of ours in Quito (locals who live there, not tourists) - they were taking a family photo and used a parked car as a tripod substitute. The father lined everyone up in the frame, hurried to take his own place, and just as the shutter fired a passer-by snatched the camera and ran off with it :(

15. Posted by AndyF (Moderator 2445 posts) 2y 1 Star this if you like it!

Quoting ToonSarah

This happened to friends of ours in Quito (locals who live there, not tourists) - they were taking a family photo and used a parked car as a tripod substitute. The father lined everyone up in the frame, hurried to take his own place, and just as the shutter fired a passer-by snatched the camera and ran off with it :(

I love to engage with people and ask them if they'd like me to take a photo with them all on - after they hand me their phone/camera I often tease them saying "I get so many phones this way". :)

Equally when people ask me to take their photo, and hand me their phone, I say "sure, I charge 5 dollars...?" and then give them a cheeky smile to show I'm kidding.

I love bantering with people I meet. My girlfriend says one day I'll get a smack in the teeth.

16. Posted by Keep Smiling (Respected Member 26 posts) 2y 1 Star this if you like it!

[quote=greatgrandmaR]
I do not have a tripod - well I should say that I have a tripod but I do not use it and never carry it on a trip.

I also own a tripod that I seldom use and certainly never take on my overseas travels. Nearly all my photography is handheld - but I do use Panasonic Lumix micro-four-thirds cameras and Panasonic or Leica lenses, so have the benefit of dual stabilisation in body and lens, which enables me to use wide apertures with slow shutter speeds and still get sharp results. Oh, and while I may be just five years or so younger than RosalieAnn, my shoulders are spared the weight of DSLR camera kit.

17. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 2079 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

Quoting Keep Smiling

[quote=greatgrandmaR]
I do not have a tripod - well I should say that I have a tripod but I do not use it and never carry it on a trip.

I also own a tripod that I seldom use and certainly never take on my overseas travels. Nearly all my photography is handheld - but I do use Panasonic Lumix micro-four-thirds cameras and Panasonic or Leica lenses, so have the benefit of dual stabilisation in body and lens, which enables me to use wide apertures with slow shutter speeds and still get sharp results. Oh, and while I may be just five years or so younger than RosalieAnn, my shoulders are spared the weight of DSLR camera kit.

When my previous camera was wearing out, I went to the store to get a camera and I wanted one with a viewfinder rather than or in addition to a screen. I was unable to find any of the smaller cameras that had a viewfinder. (This may be different now - this was 8 years ago, or it might be the deficiencies of the store as we are in a very rural area and the store might not have had a complete selection.) So I ended up with a DSLR - a Canon Rebel EOS T3. Which is heavy.

I find myself using my cell phone now in restaurants and places like that, but I still use the Canon most of the time when I am traveling, and especially for cemetery documentation and travel where I want to take photos of wild animals, and travel on a ship. The phone does not do well at zooming in long distances. My only regret is that I wish I had let my children give me a camera with GPS enabled.

18. Posted by berner256 (Moderator 1527 posts) 2y 1 Star this if you like it!

What's a good time of day to take photos? Dawn and dusk. The lighting is just beautiful.

In villages and urban areas I prefer using my mobile phone, a Pixel 3. It's less conspicuous. It also allows me to upload photos immediately to Facebook with Google Fi (the latter only is available to U.S. residents but works in 200+ countries and territories). I also carry a small pocket camera with long zoom lens, such as the Panasonic Lumix ZS60.

When hiking, I like my Panasonic Lumix FZ300, which is better sealed for dust and moisture. I'm now in Wellington, New Zealand, preparing to travel to Stewart and Ulva islands, where the weather is likely to be wet and windy. I also used it recently on a boat off the coast of Tasmania.

I take thousands of photos on each trip, transferring them daily to a solid-state drive. Those photos are transferred to a large storage unit after I return home. Photos taken by my mobile phone are stored in the cloud.

While on the road, I am always looking for photo opportunities. It's not just people and places. It's also about lighting, textures, etc. Think imaginatively; think creatively. Always have your camera ready to take the quintessential best shot.

[ Edit: Edited on 15-Oct-2019, 20:44 GMT by berner256 ]

19. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 2079 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

And practice. Preferably practice around home first before you try to learn on a trip.

20. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 1096 posts) 2y 1 Star this if you like it!

I always try to incorporate the rule of thirds in my photos for a nice sense of balance. I believe this is one of the most basic things I learned in high school photo shop.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_thirds

Quoting Berner256

What's a good time of day to take photos? Dawn and dusk. The lighting is just beautiful.

Indeed. Those times of day can take a lot of agro out of the exposure situation and that subtle quality of dawn and dusk light adds to the photo quite a bit. That good light on a subject often lasts much less than we think - mere moments, in some cases.