photography tips

Travel Forums Travel Photography photography tips

Page
Last Post
21. Posted by Peter (Admin 7022 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

I'm pretty fond of using long exposures when it's called for as well. Especially when there's running water in the scene, I can't resist it. Having a tripod would be ideal, but usually I can find something to lean my camera on to get the exposure long enough that the shot doesn't look too blurry.

Example

22. Posted by Teoni (Travel Guru 1747 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

Quoting AndyF

Quoting ToonSarah

This happened to friends of ours in Quito (locals who live there, not tourists) - they were taking a family photo and used a parked car as a tripod substitute. The father lined everyone up in the frame, hurried to take his own place, and just as the shutter fired a passer-by snatched the camera and ran off with it :(

I love to engage with people and ask them if they'd like me to take a photo with them all on - after they hand me their phone/camera I often tease them saying "I get so many phones this way". :)

Equally when people ask me to take their photo, and hand me their phone, I say "sure, I charge 5 dollars...?" and then give them a cheeky smile to show I'm kidding.

I love bantering with people I meet. My girlfriend says one day I'll get a smack in the teeth.

And they wonder why selfie sticks have become all the rage

Quoting Peter

I'm pretty fond of using long exposures when it's called for as well. Especially when there's running water in the scene, I can't resist it.

I can't say I am a big fan of that look. One of the the things I loved when I got my first digital camera was the detail that it exposed, especially when taking waterfall pictures your could actually see the droplets of water and despite taking thousands of pictures and after upgrading my camera I have just found the details more spectactular. The one time I do wish I could have had a tripod was when I was out at Coonabarabran when the sky was spectacularly full of stars. You can't do astrophotography without a tripod.

23. Posted by rickmartin.gt (Inactive 5 posts) 2y 1 Star this if you like it!

Just use the camera at AUTO and then you don't have to do anything by yourself manually.

24. Posted by ToonSarah (Travel Guru 1377 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

Quoting rickmartin.gt

Just use the camera at AUTO and then you don't have to do anything by yourself manually.

Maybe, but the auto setting can't cope well with every shot. Things like extreme weather conditions, low light levels, fast movement, indoor lighting ... There are always occasions when you could get a better photo by understanding more how your camera works and using a manual or semi-automatic setting in order to compensate for challenges and even to turn them into opportunities for a great shot!

Rosalie, if you're ever looking for a replacement camera I recommend the Panasonic Lumix TZ70 (it may have a different number over there I guess). It's a compact with a viewfinder as well as a screen, a great quality Leica lens and a pretty long zoom. I tend to use it for street photography, outings when I have to walk a long way or carry a lot, evenings when I just want to slip a camera into my handbag etc. But to be honest it's more than good enough to serve as a main camera - my husband these days uses one all the time, as do at least two friends - I think I should be on commission Personally though, I find the additional weight of my larger Panasonic Lumix FZ200 means I tend to hold it steadier, and I like its moveable screen and bigger viewfinder so I still use it for most travel photography.

25. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 2079 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

I have had four different digital cameras (two Toshibas, a Kodak and the Canon), and one of the reasons I like my Canon is that it is very quick to get ready to take a photo. My previous camera had to warm up for a couple of seconds, and if I left it on for too long (anticipating a shot), the batteries would run down quickly. Sometimes I would miss shots because of that. The Canon doesn't zoom as well, so for wildlife trips I have to get a different lens. My husband was jealous of how quickly I could take a photo so he bought himself a Canon as well. I had the T3 and he got a T5. So when I wanted one for the trip to Africa so my granddaughter could use one of them, I got another Canon but all I could find at a reasonable price was a T5i which uses different batteries although it uses the same lenses

I loved the first Toshiba (PDRM5), but eventually the on-off switch came off in my hand. The second Toshiba (PDRM81) was a disaster as it used regular AA batteries and it ate them at a horrible rate. It also had a hair or filament of some kind inside of it and I had to send it back to the repair place three times before I could get them to understand what I was talking about. I hated it so I got a Kodak DX6490 which I loved. It started to get hard to turn on and off (I got a bruised thumb), so I got a second one. But eventually both of them were failing, which was when I got the Canon.

26. Posted by Dymphna (Respected Member 223 posts) 2y 1 Star this if you like it!

When it comes to composition, a couple of things. First, make sure that your horizon is level, ALWAYS. It is the first thing you look at. Get it level.

Then use the rule of 1/3's. Your horizon, if you have one should be at 1/3 up or 1/3 down. You main subject is often 1/3 left or right with a secondary subject in the background. If something is moving in your picture and it is your main subject, give it somewhere to go in the picture. Put it at 1/3 with 2/3 of the picture to move into.

Make sure you have the subject matter in focus. If you hold your finger half way down, boxes or dots will show up on the subject matter that is in focus. If you are shooting through something, you may end up with the wrong thing in focus. Or if you have a couple of people in your picture, it might be focusing on the subject matter behind them. You want your subject matter in the box or dot. If you are having a hard time getting it to come up, move your camera to the subject, get the dot on it and then turn to have the composition you want and take the picture. Or if you have a bigger camera, go to AV setting. This is the setting for f stop. F stop determines your dept of field. A small number on this means little is in focus and is used for pictures where the main subject is in focus and the background is blurred. I love this setting. If you open this up to a larger number, you have more in focus. Most pictures do not need to go over an 8. The lower the number the smoother what is in focus will be. You typically do not want to open it us as the pictures will be grainy.

Go watch some YouTube videos on your camera on how to run it.

27. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 2079 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

I can never get the horizon level - I just correct it when I edit the photos

28. Posted by ToonSarah (Travel Guru 1377 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

Quoting Dymphna

Then use the rule of 1/3's. Your horizon, if you have one should be at 1/3 up or 1/3 down. You main subject is often 1/3 left or right with a secondary subject in the background. If something is moving in your picture and it is your main subject, give it somewhere to go in the picture. Put it at 1/3 with 2/3 of the picture to move into.

Make sure you have the subject matter in focus. If you hold your finger half way down, boxes or dots will show up on the subject matter that is in focus. If you are shooting through something, you may end up with the wrong thing in focus. Or if you have a couple of people in your picture, it might be focusing on the subject matter behind them. You want your subject matter in the box or dot. If you are having a hard time getting it to come up, move your camera to the subject, get the dot on it and then turn to have the composition you want and take the picture. Or if you have a bigger camera, go to AV setting. This is the setting for f stop. F stop determines your dept of field. A small number on this means little is in focus and is used for pictures where the main subject is in focus and the background is blurred. I love this setting.

I really like using a shallow depth of field on occasion too - it can be very effective and lift your photos out of the ordinary imho.

While I agree about following the rule of thirds most of the time, I do think it's important to be flexible. Rules are made to be broken, and now and then I like to put the horizon right across the middle - it can create a sense of drama sometimes, and at other times a sense of calm, oddly enough. I also like sometimes to crop photos to a more extreme rectangle, almost a panorama shape.

But you have to know the rules first in order to break them! It's the same as the one about 'never shoot into the sun' - look at all the wonderful backlit images photographers have created which we would never have if they'd obeyed that rule

29. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 2079 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

Quoting ToonSarah

But you have to know the rules first in order to break them! It's the same as the one about 'never shoot into the sun' - look at all the wonderful backlit images photographers have created which we would never have if they'd obeyed that rule

Which comes down to - PRACTICE. Go out and take lots of photos and you will learn what works and what doesn't. We are lucky with digital photos that we can see what we've got right away and can try again if it hasn't worked the way we want it to.

And practice editing too. Editing is easier these days too. In the old days with film, editing was much more difficult.

It is like playing the piano or riding a bike. You need to practice.

If you started out with film, one of the unnerving things about digital photography used in auto is that the camera will adjust the exposure time to suit the light and it won't tell you that it is doing that. And the photo will turn out blurry because you haven't held the camera still enough. It took me awhile to figure that out.

30. Posted by ToonSarah (Travel Guru 1377 posts) 2y Star this if you like it!

Quoting greatgrandmaR

If you started out with film, one of the unnerving things about digital photography used in auto is that the camera will adjust the exposure time to suit the light and it won't tell you that it is doing that. And the photo will turn out blurry because you haven't held the camera still enough. It took me awhile to figure that out.

You should be able to see exposure details and other settings in the viewfinder if you adjust your display preferences accordingly