Food while a trip

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1. Posted by Hoonat (Budding Member 14 posts) 4w Star this if you like it!

Hi everybody,

Another way to find out about the culture in other countries is to taste the "cuisine" .
What are your preferences, do you like to taste local dishes? Have you ever tried something that disgusted you first but you really liked after you ate it?
In the jungle of touristic food, how do you identify a real local restaurant? Have you ever tried street food and what do you think of it? Finally, what is the most amazing thing you ate on a trip?

Make me travel through your answers.

Have a nice day

2. Posted by mxnrd (First Time Poster 1 posts) 4w Star this if you like it!

I always find it an interesting challenge to try different local culinary dishes. I'm just not a fan of eating insects such as grasshoppers, I don't eat anything that is small and crawls around. I don't like too spicy food either. But in general I have very good experiences with local food, it's an essential part of travel. I also never had any problems with street food abroad.

3. Posted by Astrogate (First Time Poster 1 posts) 4w Star this if you like it!

When I travel around the world, an important part of my trip is local cuisine: I want to discover and enjoy the exotic tasty dishes. This is motivated by the willingness to try new things and expand knowledge. Because this is a discovery, sometimes a traveler may get something disgusted, while sometimes he can find something delicious, but, above all, he should try and judge it: success comes after numerous failures. In the jungle of touristic food, I first need to Google and do some research to find the reliable sources about the typical dishes of that state/province. The next thing I need to do is scan for these dishes throughout the streets I visit. The kinds of local food I'm keen on the most are fruits, seafood, insects, noddles, soup, cakes, and many more.

4. Posted by suzaingeorge (First Time Poster 1 posts) 3w Star this if you like it!

Fruit and vegetables: It depends on how many meals we plan to cook, but I always like fruit with my cereal and it is also nice to stock up on bananas for an easy snack.
Smoothie ingredients: Frozen (organic) berries, plain yogurt, and more bananas.
Hummus and 100% whole-wheat crackers (like Triscuits): Both items can be found in most stores.
Cheese: All four of us are cheese lovers…we’ve gotta have cheese.
Eggs: They won’t be farmer’s market quality, but I get the best I can find.
PB&J: We need something to put on the good bread that we brought!
Ingredients for easy dinners (if you plan to “eat-in”): Whole-wheat pasta dish, seafood, quiche, or quesadillas – made on those traveling tortillas!

5. Posted by Hoonat (Budding Member 14 posts) 3w Star this if you like it!

I usually eat local food because It's very interesting to try something different. There are so many ways to cook and make different dishes with the same ingredients. "Cuisine" is a real science for me. I love spicy food. This summer I ate in an Indian restaurant in Wales, I often eat a vindaloo dish,( whatever it is chicken, vegetable...) very spicy, very tasty, but this one was so spicy I was about to cry. I think they wanted to test me. It's weird, waiters are always surprised that a woman like peppers, they always me to take something sweeter.
Have you had such experience before?

Good day ll of you

6. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 1003 posts) 3w Star this if you like it!

> this one was so spicy I was about to cry. I think they wanted to test me.

Of course they didn't want to 'test you'! No UK restaurant would treat its customers in that way, for very obvious reasons. UK Indian restaurants vary their dishes according to local preferences (again for obvious reasons) and you just happened to choose one where the vindaloo was spicier than others you've eaten.

7. Posted by RyanRay10 (Inactive 3 posts) 3w Star this if you like it!

Best you have try your already ate food. Don't try new one at new places.

8. Posted by 55vineyard (Budding Member 49 posts) 3w Star this if you like it!

I want to be able to identify what I am eating either via visual inspection or menu description but of course am willing to try new dishes if they appeal to me.
Not sure what you mean by "real" restaurant, if they are cooking and serving food that seems real enough to me.

9. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 370 posts) 3w Star this if you like it!

For Fiona and me and the budget we're on, food in Mexico and Central America is a let-down in terms of variety rather than taste. This may not be typical - again, I'm merely speaking of our experience, on our budget.

Street foods in Mexico and some countries in Central America tend to largely focus on tacos or tortas (sandwiches). If you don't want a taco you may find something very similar being served (meat, onion, perhaps a bit of cheese) on a flat tortilla or a rolled tortilla. Essentially, the tortilla is presented many different ways, often filled, rolled or topped with the same components. These are called different things - often with a slight regional way of preparation thrown in to the mix - but they all taste the same to us.

We were surprised by what was (and wasn't) popular in this section of the world, especially in Mexico. Whole roast chickens are a huge nationwide favorite and many Mexicans love instant cup-of-noodles - loads of shops sell these, with a kettle of boiling water at the ready behind the counter and even many street carts sell cup-of-noodles, frequently running out of them throughout the day. Rice and beans, synonymous with Mexican food north of the border, very, very rarely accompany a meal at a restaurant in Mexico. Instead, endless corn tortillas are served to add carbs and boost the main dish.

Nicaragua was a pleasant exception in the region and tortillas rarely factored in at all either in basic restaurants or street food carts, so that was nice. Buses in El Salvador see all sorts of vendors selling a nice variety of foods, again not necessarily centered on the tortilla. Costa Rica seldom served tortillas with a casado, but that country was a budget-crusher for us and we sadly rushed through each time without seeing much - or eating much.

So far, the most amazing thing we've tasted on the road has been tapado soup from the Garifuna town of Livingston, Guatemala. This is a coconut broth soup with a whole fried fish, a whole crab, freshwater shellfish, marine cockles, shrimp, plantains and thankfully no tortillas. This soup represented an astounding amount of flavor after months of stodgy Mexican and Guatemalan food. We busted the budget for a week solid ordering giant bowls of this fresh, made-to-order specialty - and it was worth it every time.

[ Edit: Edited on 26-Oct-2019, 22:01 GMT by road to roam ]

10. Posted by Hoonat (Budding Member 14 posts) 3w Star this if you like it!

Quoting leics2

> this one was so spicy I was about to cry. I think they wanted to test me.

Of course they didn't want to 'test you'! No UK restaurant would treat its customers in that way, for very obvious reasons. UK Indian restaurants vary their dishes according to local preferences (again for obvious reasons) and you just happened to choose one where the vindaloo was spicier than others you've eaten.

When I said "test me" , I meant they were having fun to see me eating the dish, it was excellent in fact even spicier, and it's already very spicy here. But you're right, we had very good moments in restaurants in the UK, people are very friendly.

Have a nice day