Food while a trip

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21. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1312 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

In Grenada, I got something called "Oil Down" This was pretty much all the kinds of food one could have. There was a piece of fish, a pig's knuckle, a chicken wing, breadfruit, callaloo (which looks a bit like spinach) and various other things.

https://photos.travellerspoint.com/880679/large_7536789-Where_the_Locals_Eat.jpg

They also have Rotis and something called a Buss UP. Roti is meat etc in a thing like a soft taco. I don't know what a Buss Up is. I have found out that Lambie which I see advertised everyplace is conch.

22. Posted by Beausoleil (Travel Guru 1272 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

Conch is lambi. It is quite common in Haiti and delicious. The shells make great horns if you saw off the tip.

23. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1312 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

Quoting Beausoleil

Conch is lambi. It is quite common in Haiti and delicious.

Well I said it the other way around - Lambi is conch.

But Bob got very sick after he had conch at Chub Cay (in the Bahamas) so he thinks he is allergic to it (and he may be), so I mostly don't eat it either.

24. Posted by Beausoleil (Travel Guru 1272 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

No, you said "lambie" and that's a fuzzy little four-legged creature that goes baaa.

He may very well be allergic. Quite a few people are. He also may have had some that wasn't well prepared and gotten a touch of food poisoning. That's pretty common especially when it's very hot.

25. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1312 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

I am a horrible speller and I read so quickly that I often have only a vague idea of the letters in a word. I never learned to spell until after I learned to type where I had to enter each letter and couldn't just read the outline of the word. But in Grenada they spell it "Lambie" I just went back and looked at some of the menus to check.

We were in Chub in early March and it was kind of cool - definitely not hot. I didn't eat the same thing as he did so I didn't get sick. ( I asked for rigatoni, and after about 20 minutes, they came back and said they didn't have any pasta, and could I pick something else. So I had grouper. (They had gone over and opened up the store, but there wasn’t any there either.))

He once had 3 strawberry smoothies and developed a rash - for awhile he couldn't eat strawberries. But he's gotten over that.

26. Posted by karazyal (Travel Guru 2341 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

Nowadays I am less daring in eating anything odd or different. I mostly eat to survive when overseas! I prefer to choose items that I can recognize. For meats I prefer well done compared to still bleeding or barely warmed over! I am fussy with what I eat in my own home country not just overseas! There is stuff I won't touch in my own city!

I avoid stuff that stinks or looks disgusting. I avoid foods that use raw blood as part of the ingredients. In Europe or Western countries I stick mostly to meat and vegetables that I can recognize. I don't do sushi!

In Asia I avoid farmed raised fish because of their diet of duck and pig feces. (BTW, this "farm raised fish and shrimp" is exported all over the world! Look it up!) Pig waste, chicken and duck manure helps grow algae but they also eat the poop too.

In Asia I can survive on good old fried rice anywhere I go. When I was much younger in this area I tried the fried grasshoppers and peanuts but usually after consuming a little alcohol. I like fried bananas and crepes but without any onion pieces, just the coconut with the meringue.

Once in the Bahamas with some friends we stopped by these little seaside shacks selling local specialties, one I liked was some sort of meat pie turnover. Should have stopped at just one and had to stay pretty close to bathrooms for a few days.

Older now I am more cautious with where I eat and what I eat. I read posts on this forum and other forums from visitors who can't wait to try "street food" in Asia. Yeah, no running water so the cook can clean his or her hands off. Sometimes using the street for a urinal. Not to mention how long the food has been out in the heat with flies, road dust and grit flying around.

I have gone through survival training many years ago in the military. I still remember not to eat polar bear livers, watch what monkeys eat, some plants to dig up and how to find grubs. So, if my plane crashes in a remote area I will eat anything to survive but nowadays I am more picky than before!

Hygiene is one thing I am more careful with now. Clean hands off before touching food is one thing I do anywhere out of the house. Transference of crap on fingers to food you touch means you are eating that crap too! Ever notice someone leaving the toilet (loo) without cleaning his or her hands of - well that person touches a lot of things everyone else touches! Door handles, chairs, etc.

I eat to survive and have no problem even if it means something unexciting! Someone else wants to eat cooked tails ends from chickens or "rocky mountain oysters" - go for it!

https://www.hostelworld.com/blog/the-50-weirdest-foods-from-around-the-world/

I have had haggis and it was okay. Had reindeer before. I wouldn't touch a stinky balut if I had a gun at my head! Bar girls in the Philippines used to like eating them in front of tourists to gross them out! have had the stinky cheese in France. I hate the smell of blood sausage. (My mother loved it!) Pickled eggs in bars - no problem!

I was amused with Spam being on one of the odd foods. I grew up with Spam being on the menu from time to time. Fried up with eggs it is not too bad. Now I would slice it and fry all the grease out of it before eating it.

We all have our likes and dislikes!

27. Posted by Hoonat (Budding Member 14 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

Quoting Beausoleil

Hi Hoonat. The biscuits I like from Haiti are called paté and are a puff pastry filled with a cooked mixture of meats (can be pork, beef or chicken), little hot peppers, onion and seasonings and possibly some tomato. I'm not sure what all goes into them, but every morning the vendors come around with trays of them and they are delicious. They are small but a great substitute for the oatmeal we usually got for breakfast.

Hi Beausoleil,

Thanks for your answer. It really seems to be yummy, I'll try to find a recipe online, who knows! It sounds like savory doughnuts. Was it fried or rather baked, do you know? Did you try to make it at home? Very often when I eat something I liked, I try it home. It can be a good or a bad idea sometimes :()

Have a nice evening

28. Posted by Beausoleil (Travel Guru 1272 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

Quoting Hoonat

Quoting Beausoleil

Hi Hoonat. The biscuits I like from Haiti are called paté and are a puff pastry filled with a cooked mixture of meats (can be pork, beef or chicken), little hot peppers, onion and seasonings and possibly some tomato. I'm not sure what all goes into them, but every morning the vendors come around with trays of them and they are delicious. They are small but a great substitute for the oatmeal we usually got for breakfast.

Hi Beausoleil,

Thanks for your answer. It really seems to be yummy, I'll try to find a recipe online, who knows! It sounds like savory doughnuts. Was it fried or rather baked, do you know? Did you try to make it at home? Very often when I eat something I liked, I try it home. It can be a good or a bad idea sometimes :()

Have a nice evening

I suspect they were fried. Nearly everything sold on the street is fried. It's about the only way they have to cook. I've never tried them at home. What I love and make at home is griots. This is pork in a citrus sauce and served with red beans and rice or just with rice. You should be able to get recipes for any of these online. They are very popular.

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