Travel on Halloween

Travel Forums General Talk Travel on Halloween

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1. Posted by Cottonwood (Budding Member 110 posts) 3w Star this if you like it!

Ok, most of us traveler's, at least the one's I know here in the USA, travel on holiday times like Thanksgiving in late November and Christmas time in December.

Now, the question is, Has anyone traveled on a holiday like Halloween being that today is October 31? Have you ever traveled to somewhere that is known to be scary like Transylvania or a place with a haunted house, graveyard, whatever?

I've only traveled a couple hours away from my hometown to the haunted town of Albion, Idaho, never past that. How about you?

2. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 1003 posts) 3w 1 Star this if you like it!

Hallowe'en isn't a holiday in the UK. Commercial pressure (i.e businesses wanting to make money) has led to us gradually import the US version (trick or treat, decorating the house etc) over the past 15/20 years or so. Before then any Hallowe'en activity people indulged in (and most didn't) was very low-key: perhaps a children's party with apple-bobbing or similar.

I'm sure lots of people in the UK travel on 31st October. It doesn't really have any particular significance and I doubt anyone here would either avoid travelling or deliberately decide to travel on that date.

I've been to Transylvania. It is a lovely part of Romania, especially the rural areas. The rolling countryside is beautiful, the shepherds still stay with their flocks and the cowherds watch their animals throughout the day. There are bears, wolves and eagles, though fewer than there once were. Transylvania is not in the least bit spooky or 'haunted' though, understandably, the Romanians have taken full advantage of tourist interest in Dracula etc at Bran Castle and in the historical centre of Sigishoara where Vlad Dracul (Vlad the Impaler) was born. I personally have no interest.

I don't seek out 'haunted' places (the UK is stuffed with them) but I often visit graveyards and cemeteries, both here and abroad. Burial places can tell you a lot about local life, culture and history. Apart from the obvious (e.g. Pere Lachaise in Paris, Highgate Cemetery in London) some of the most fascinating burial places I've visited are: the cemetery in Vysehrad, Prague, which has stunning memorial sculptures; the vast and amazing Mirogoj cemetery in Zagreb; the various ancient catacombs in historical Rome; a tiny burial ground in rural Connecticut, deep in the woods with no buidings anywhere near and only initials carved on the headstones; the graveyard of Holy Rude and the Old Town cemetery in Stirling, Scotland, full of historical memorial stones and fascinating stories. And lots more. :-)

3. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 370 posts) 3w Star this if you like it!

We once needed to make a run into Mexico from Guatemala to renew our 90 day CA-4 visitor visa and we did it on October 31st.

Our aim then was Tapachula, just over the border into the Mexican state of Chiapas to experience El Dia de los Muertos. This is a large, interesting and very vibrant city off the path of most foreign visitors. It was a great experience for us and we spent 3 days here.

Having not donned a costume for Halloween in about 35 years (since I was a wee one) I find it odd so many adults in the US dress up on what I still consider to be a time for the kiddies, really - it's quite an ordeal here.

[ Edit: Edited on 01-Nov-2019, 00:16 GMT by road to roam ]

4. Posted by Cottonwood (Budding Member 110 posts) 3w Star this if you like it!

Got that right, the grocery store I work at pays us employs to dress up and we have a inter company contest for the best dressed. Gets crazy with all these adults in costumes around the store.

5. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1312 posts) 3w Star this if you like it!

Since my youngest child is 48, I have not gone trick or treating in years. In the past I would worry about being away on Halloween because I was afraid of tricks when we weren't home to give out treats. But we live on a dead end street with the other end a busy highway so we don't get kids trick or treating at our house.

I have visited quite a few graveyards and some of them in the Caribbean (Grenada, St. Lucia etc) will light candles on the graves on All Hallow's Eve. In one case a captain of a ship ran around as he thought the lights at the cemetery were the lights of St. George on the other side of the island. I've also been to Transylvania University (in Kentucky) where Bob's great great grandfather studied (and wrote his thesis).

I tend to go on cruises in October or November and at least four of the cruises were over Halloween - most of the time the cruise director has some kind of party - everyone dresses up in costumes and the ship is decorated. I have a costume that I wear - a long white cotton nightgown and a mob cap with a wolf mask. My companion wears a red cape. I am Red Riding hood's grandmother and if I put the wolf mask on I am grandma after the wolf has eaten her.
Me and my sister in 2018
https://photos.travellerspoint.com/880679/large_IMG_4375.JPG

With another friend in 2016
https://photos.travellerspoint.com/880679/large_IMG_8446.JPG

[ Edit: Edited on 01-Nov-2019, 02:10 GMT by greatgrandmaR ]

6. Posted by Teoni (Travel Guru 813 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

On my father's side of the family they celebrate the Hungry Ghost festival. It is more about honouring your ancestors but a fair few ghost stories are told around that time and Asian ghost stories are far more freaky and twisted than those in the West. If you are into spells and charms there are always hawkers of that stuff for the really superstitious during the festivities and in some communities they have people who dress up as demons and do these frantic performances and of course lots of crackers and fireworks.

On my mother's side they have a day of the dead but it is mostly a sedate affair of going to the family cemetery and cleaning the place up, making sure your families graves are up kept and then mass at church. The are a couple if ghost stories and superstitions associated with the day but it really is a pretty quiet day.

I once did a ghost tour at Jenolan Caves but I didn't find it particularly interesting or scary. In Australia they claim the most haunted place is a house called Monte Cristo but being let's face it a complete sceptic I can see myself ever forking out money to stay there. It is all a bit too theatrical for my liking.

[ Edit: Edited on 01-Nov-2019, 12:48 GMT by Teoni ]

7. Posted by victory- (Budding Member 3 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

it is awesome
I always stay at home tho

Post 8 was removed by a moderator
9. Posted by Borisborough (Moderator 1395 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

Quoting Cottonwood

Ok, most of us traveler's, at least the one's I know here in the USA, travel on holiday times like Thanksgiving in late November and Christmas time in December.

Now, the question is, Has anyone traveled on a holiday like Halloween being that today is October 31? Have you ever traveled to somewhere that is known to be scary like Transylvania or a place with a haunted house, graveyard, whatever?

I've only traveled a couple hours away from my hometown to the haunted town of Albion, Idaho, never past that. How about you?

Thanksgiving is generally a national US holiday in November (or October in Canada). A few Caribbean Islands also have a national Thanksgiving holiday as does Liberia in Africa but I'm not sure other countries have it as a national holiday. In the UK, the Harvest Festival is probably the equivalent and is generally a Christian celebration held on a Sunday determined by the moon. That's true in some other European countries too but it's not a national holiday.

Halloween on 31 October, again traditionally a pagan festival adopted by the Christians as a festival of All Saints, is not a national holiday in the UK either, nor anywhere else in the world, as far as documented evidence suggests. The British (and, strangely, New Zealanders and Australians) celebrate Guy Fawkes Night (or Bonfire Night) with toffee-apples, fireworks and bonfires. It is the commemoration of the failure of a Catholic plot to overthrow King James I at the State Opening of Parliament in 1605 - but that's not a national holiday either.

As for visiting places that are haunted, that's a very subjective and emotive description. Most people of a scientific background would dispute the fact that any place could be haunted.

Since all these are standard working days outside of North America, they're not days upon which I generally travel - but they're definitely a good excuse to dress up, eat and drink and have a bit of fun.

10. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 1003 posts) 2w Star this if you like it!

>Halloween on 31 October, again traditionally a pagan festival adopted by the Christians as a festival of All Saints,

Hallowe'en (occurring at much the same time as the pagan festival of Samhain) is properly named 'All Hallows Eve', preceding All Hallows (All Saints) Day on 1st November. That's how it got its name.

Traditionally, services for All Hallows/All Saints Day began on the evening of 31st and ended in the evening of 1st November. The 2nd is All Souls Day, when all the dead are remembered (not just the saints). Family graves are iften visited on All Souls and, in some countries, candles are lit on the grave (a practice which still continues in some European countries). In some countries there are bigger celebrations (e.g. the Day of the Dead in Mexico).

All Saints Day (and occasionally All Souls Day) is a public holiday in a few EU countries (e.g. Slovakia, Slovenia, Poland).

For many centuries there has been a traditional/folk (not religiously Christian) idea that the 'veil' between the living and the dea is thinner on the eve of these two holy days, allowing evil spirits and th restless dead to more easily enter the living world. The idea that Halloween should be 'celebrated' in any way....and especially with trick or treat, fancy dress etc etc is very new indeed. As I said initially, it developed in the USA (there's an irony there), primarily for commercial reasons and...for the ame reasons...has been adopted in some European countries. But it's certainly not a public holiday or any sort of 'national' celebration.