Have you ever considered the "Not So Popular" destination?

Travel Forums General Talk Have you ever considered the "Not So Popular" destination?

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61. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1714 posts) 6d Star this if you like it!

If pineapples are so expensive that they are rented for centerpieces at a dinner party, I doubt they are going to be given to guests. Even if they were, I cannot conceive that one would be given to a guest to hasten their departure. How could they have any gift for someone to tell them that it was time to leave?

62. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 551 posts) 6d Star this if you like it!

Quoting greatgrandmaR

If pineapples are so expensive that they are rented for centerpieces...

This is such an odd idea - how lucrative could this be?? Did pineapples grown in one region fetch a higher price? How competitive was the rental market - did the tables lean toward the owner of the pineapples, or the renter? Was there a prime rental season?

I did once read it was common in New England during colonial times to rent old dogs from the tavern one was drinking in. These old dogs would lull about under the table, providing a bit of warmth. The most sought-after (and expensive) dogs were the ones who would let patrons put their feet under the belly of the canine in order to keep them warm. I don't know how true this is but I wonder if these taverns ever branched out and considered pineapples, too...

63. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1714 posts) 6d Star this if you like it!

Pineapples didn't grow here in those days. They were imported. I found the notation about pineapples being expensive on a National Park Service website when I was trying to find a way to disprove what the crazy lady guide in Louisiana had told us.

64. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 551 posts) 6d Star this if you like it!

Quoting greatgrandmaR

Pineapples didn't grow here in those days.

I know that - the fact that these were grown quite far away at that time is another reason why pineapple rental may have been full of all sorts of strange variables. I am not saying this did or did not happen - just that it's quite a peculiar idea.

[ Edit: Edited on 01-Aug-2020, 23:10 GMT by road to roam ]

65. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1714 posts) 6d Star this if you like it!

I agree. The lady guide that told that story about giving a guest a pineapple also told me that I was not allowed to take photos when the brochure for the house said quite clearly that photos were allowed.

66. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 551 posts) 6d Star this if you like it!

Quoting greatgrandmaR

I agree. The lady guide...told me that I was not allowed to take photos when the brochure for the house said quite clearly that photos were allowed.

So, did you take any photos?

67. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1714 posts) 6d 2 Star this if you like it!

You bet.

68. Posted by ToonSarah (Travel Guru 1297 posts) 6d Star this if you like it!

Coincidentally (I assume) this has just popped up on the BBC News website: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-53432877:

'Centuries before even the man from Del Monte said "yes", the country's must-have accessory graced the table at the very richest aristocrats' social gatherings.

But the scaly sweet was too valuable to eat - a single fruit was worth thousands of pounds and often the same pineapple would be paraded from event to event until it eventually went rotten.

Later, a roaring trade in pineapple rental developed, where ambitious but less well-off folk might hire one for a special event, dinner party or even just to jauntily tuck under an arm on a show-off stroll.'

69. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1714 posts) 5d Star this if you like it!

Thanks Sarah - I was not hallucinating - as bizarre as it sounds, they really did rent pineapples.

70. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 551 posts) 5d Star this if you like it!

Quoting ToonSarah

'Centuries before even the man from Del Monte said "yes", the country's must-have accessory graced the table at the very richest aristocrats' social gatherings.

But the scaly sweet was too valuable to eat - a single fruit was worth thousands of pounds and often the same pineapple would be paraded from event to event until it eventually went rotten.

Later, a roaring trade in pineapple rental developed, where ambitious but less well-off folk might hire one for a special event, dinner party or even just to jauntily tuck under an arm on a show-off stroll.'

This is a good read touching on pineapple rental in the past. However the article states there are only two varieties which remain in cultivation today. There are many more than that.

[ Edit: Edited on 02-Aug-2020, 14:48 GMT by road to roam ]