Natural wonders made to look always perfect WDYT?

Travel Forums General Talk Natural wonders made to look always perfect WDYT?

Page
  • 1
  • 2
Last Post
1. Posted by Teoni (Travel Guru 1897 posts) 4w Star this if you like it!

A hiker's video has been causing controversy after they filmed a waterfall in China being fed water from a pipe so it keeps flowing even when water levels are low so tourists visiting would never be disappointed.

It is not first time a natural wonder has been manipulated to look consistent for tourists and I get why it is done but I am curious what do people think about it? Do you care? Would you be disappointed or do you think the disappointment of it not being picture perfect after making all the effort to get there means this is a worthwhile endeavour? Or do you think travellers need to accept nature is not always perfect?

2. Posted by goodfish (Full Member 332 posts) 4w 1 Star this if you like it!

Yep, Mother Nature is fickle so you have to be willing to take whatever she throws you. It's a caution I've given travelers to our national parks for years when they plan little time at any of them.

For instance, we've been to the Grand Canyon south rim when it was completely socked in with fog and rain; folks there on one-day bus tours from Las Vegas were NOT happy. Those tours spend about 4-5 hours, each way, on the road for a mere 2-3 hours or so on the rim. Ugh.

A nasty incoming storm at Zion shut down popular trails a day in advance, and ended up washing out some roads and closing the park for a time. Another at a unit of Canyonlands closed the 30-mile road in, and created flash flooding in popular nearby slot canyons.

Numerous other examples apply so as a rule we plan multiple-night stays at/near the parks for some flex around weather or other related snag, such as temporary closures due to storm or fire.

[ Edit: Edited on 17 Jun 2024, 12:07 GMT by goodfish ]

3. Posted by BeateR (Full Member 307 posts) 4w 1 Star this if you like it!

During our so many trips all around the world we so often experienced bad weather, a road closed because of a landslide, an early or very late winter snow storm what stopped us, a dry waterfall what we not expected, a.s.o. I could write bookes about. But I think, that's part of traveling. If you don't like it than you have to book 2 weeks all included in a hotel at the sea. Or do a cruise shop journey. But even there something can go wrong.

4. Posted by Peter (Admin 7250 posts) 4w 1 Star this if you like it!

So many waterways have reduced flows due to dams, agricultural water use, etc. I don't really have a problem with water being diverted into a river system that is running dry so long as it isn't depriving some other area that needs the water for environmental purposes.

As a traveller, I wouldn't at all expect the natural environment to be manipulated for my benefit - other than people caring for it to ensure it is there for future generations.. I also don't expect the natural environment to be left entirely to its own devices. A degree of human intervention is often necessary to maintain natural environments. For example, keeping pests or weeds under control. Or even things like burning off in certain times of the year to reduce the risk of fires.

5. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 2655 posts) 4w 1 Star this if you like it!

I am all for photographing things as they are. It's nice if it is at its best. I have been quite lucky in being able to visit Haleakala on two days when it was clear and you could see acoss the crater. I also visited Anchorage on a day when the mountains were free of clouds and I've been able to see Arenal when there were no clouds obstructing the view.

I have been places when I was not so lucky. I booked a trip to Tikal at the full moon in order to see the full moon rise over the pyramids. And it was cloudy and we couldn't see anything. (Not that anything could have been done about that by anyone).

A cruise ship journey isn't necessarily free of disappointments either. My friend just went on a cruise and she said they had rain for 6 days. And they couldn't get to one port because the wind and waves were too great for the ship to dock. Also some ships currently doing the Rhine - the water levels are too high for the boats to get under the bridges so people are bussed to the towns. Or in other cases the water levels are too low to bloat the boats. There's always something. It's part of traveling.

6. Posted by Sergio Gonzalo (Budding Member 12 posts) 4w 1 Star this if you like it!

Sometimes, what seems bad luck (a day of rain) may bring amazing things!

7. Posted by Psamathe (Budding Member 392 posts) 4w Star this if you like it!

Quoting greatgrandmaR

I am all for photographing things as they are. It's nice if it is at its best....

For me the question becomes what is "as they are"? In the original example does that mean as they are now, with all the human changes to extract water for agriculture causing minimal to no flow or as they are in a natural world without human interference, etc.

And for photographs maybe this relates to why we take photos. As a personal reminder of the visit, to illustrate nature's beauty, to highlight the impact of human interference and damage, etc.

Ian

8. Posted by Psamathe (Budding Member 392 posts) 4w Star this if you like it!

Quoting Teoni

A hiker's video has been causing controversy after they filmed a waterfall in China being fed water from a pipe so it keeps flowing even when water levels are low so tourists visiting would never be disappointed.

It is not first time a natural wonder has been manipulated to look consistent for tourists and I get why it is done but I am curious what do people think about it? Do you care? Would you be disappointed or do you think the disappointment of it not being picture perfect after making all the effort to get there means this is a worthwhile endeavour? Or do you think travellers need to accept nature is not always perfect?

In this example has it been established that the topping up of water flow is there only for tourism? Or is this what tourists have assumed.

There are a lot of cases where river flows are fed artificially supplemented to protect the environment and allow fauna and flora to survive. Often reasons for supplementing flows are not publicised.

I don't know of the site OP has raised but sometimes one person makes an assumption, posts on Social Media, others take it as fact and repeat it and suddenly a single assumption has become widespread "established" fact.

Ian

[ Edit: Edited on 19 Jun 2024, 10:40 GMT by Psamathe ]

9. Posted by Teoni (Travel Guru 1897 posts) 4w 1 Star this if you like it!

Quoting Psamathe

In this example has it been established that the topping up of water flow is there only for tourism? Or is this what tourists have assumed.

Yes it was confirmed by the park operators:
Hiker finds pipe feeding China's tallest waterfall

10. Posted by Psamathe (Budding Member 392 posts) 3w 1 Star this if you like it!

Quoting Teoni

Quoting Psamathe

In this example has it been established that the topping up of water flow is there only for tourism? Or is this what tourists have assumed.

Yes it was confirmed by the park operators:
Hiker finds pipe feeding China's tallest waterfall

Then does it become like visiting a temple (man made) or giant dam (man made), or a market, etc.

Does issue with the waterfall become that it's being assumed to something it isn't? A lot of natural environments are not fully natural. Many visiting "rainforests" actually visit secondary rainforests (few bother to seek out primary rainforest.

But then maybe I'm weird as I find even dry waterfalls can be amazing (eg during the dry season).

Ian