What would you pack?

Travel Forums General Talk What would you pack?

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91. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 319 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Had some fun blowing the dust off this thread...

A calculator

Memory sticks (?)

A compass

And my favorite: A piece of rope!

92. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1154 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

I was on the front page, looking to see what was there. I haven't done that much until now- I just went to write my trips up.

Is a memory stick another name for a thumb drive?

I think a calculator was in there - I carry one, but mostly I use my phone for that now.

93. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 319 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Quoting greatgrandmaR

Is a memory stick another name for a thumb drive?

I believe that is an "archaic" way of saying that, yes.

[ Edit: Edited on 06-Aug-2019, 03:33 GMT by road to roam ]

94. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1154 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Quoting road to roam

Quoting greatgrandmaR

Is a memory stick another name for a thumb drive?

I believe that is an archaic way of saying that, yes.

Maybe it is just a local name for it - also sometimes called a "flash drive"?

95. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 319 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Memory stick and flash drive are used interchangeably, but are indeed 2 different things, says the internet.

Still, I haven't heard "memory stick" used in yonks and bleems.

[ Edit: Edited on 06-Aug-2019, 03:50 GMT by road to roam ]

96. Posted by AndyF (Moderator 1677 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Quoting road to roam

Memory stick and flash drive are used interchangeably, but are indeed 2 different things, says the internet.

Still, I haven't heard "memory stick" used in yonks and bleems.

Memory stick is the most common term for it that I hear, then flash drive. Thumb drive is a bit odd.

97. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 845 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Andy's right. It's not an 'archaic term' at all, just a difference in terminology in different countries.

'Memory stick' is most commonly used in the UK, followed by 'flash drive'. I've never come across anyone or anything here referring to a 'thumb drive'.

[ Edit: Edited on 06-Aug-2019, 09:43 GMT by leics2 ]

98. Posted by road to roam (Travel Guru 319 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Quoting leics2

Andy's right. It's not an 'archaic term' at all, just a difference in terminology in different countries.

'Memory stick' is most commonly used in the UK, followed by 'flash drive'. I've never come across anyone or anything here referring to a 'thumb drive'.

As I said above, they are used interchangeably - both here and in the UK apparently. That doesn't mean they're the same things (and they're not). Whichever device you are using (laptop or your mobile) depends on whether or not you'll need a flash drive or a memory stick, respectively.

A flash drive is more "universal" as it simply fits into an external USB port.

A "memory stick" fits internally into a device and therefore comes in many different shapes to fit specific devices - these are in no way universal.

Your mobile likely has no USB port and instead relies on a memory stick to do the same things a flash drive will do - store data via SSD. They seem to be called memory cards or even memory chips here and, as you and Andy say, memory sticks in the UK. My S5 uses an optional "memory stick" placed internally.

The term Memory Stick was actually proprietary to Sony for some years. Here is more on what exactly a memory stick is:
https://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/70681/sony-memory-stick

Here is a much-better-than-mine explanation of the differences between a flash drive and a memory stick:
https://www.cheapharddrivesstorage.com/difference-flash-drive-usb-memory-stick/

To add to the confusion, if you do a search (image or shopping) of memory stick on google, both products show up. However, in tech parlance a flash drive and a memory stick are very different things both used to store data in the same exact way

It seems the terminology is too interchangeable at this stage? Side by side they are apples and oranges, though.

[ Edit: Edited on 06-Aug-2019, 12:08 GMT by road to roam ]

99. Posted by leics2 (Travel Guru 845 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

>They seem to be called memory cards or even memory chips here and, as you and Andy say, memory sticks in the UK.

That isn't the case.

A 'memory stick' here is neither a 'memory card' nor a 'memory chip'. 'Memory sticks' are external USB storage devices which are not product-specific (a 'flash drive', if you wish). They simply need a USB port. Here are some examples:

https://www.argos.co.uk/browse/technology/laptops-and-pcs/external-hard-drives-and-usb-storage/usb-storage/c:30072/

What we call memory cards/SD cards here are internalised and can be product-specific, in that some devices take a micro card whilst others do not. E.g.

https://www.argos.co.uk/browse/technology/cameras-and-camcorders/memory-cards-and-readers/memory-cards/c:30184/

But the main point, regardless of whether it is 100% accurate in your experience of 'tech parlance' or not, is that 'memory stick' is not an 'archaic' term. It's commonly used by UK techies (if only when speaking to non-techies) and is just another variation within the various Englishes. :-)

[ Edit: Edited on 06-Aug-2019, 12:40 GMT by leics2 ]

100. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 1154 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

I don't think thumb drive is an archaic term either even though road_to_road seems to think so. I also carry an external hard drive and because my laptop has only one USB port, I carry something that plugs into the one USB port that I can plug several things into it.

A packing list on the front page is probably a good idea, but there are a couple of problems with it and one of them is that terminology between various English speaking countries differs. I know that a jumper in the UK is not the same as a jumper in the USA. Near as I can tell, what I call a jumper (a pullover dress with no sleeves or collar) is what you guys call a pinafore. In American English, pinafore always refers to an apron. What the UK calls a jumper, we call a sweater - usually a pullover type sweater, as a sweater that opens in the front is called a cardigan here.

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