Croagh Patrick

Travel Guide Europe Ireland County Mayo Croagh Patrick

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Introduction

Croagh Patrick, is a religious mountain in County Mayo, West Ireland situated 8 kilometres from the picturesque village of Westport. Westport caters for the tourist trade so there is plenty of accommodation and the roads to the mountain are well sign posted. It is believed that Croagh Patrick is the mountain from where St Patrick banished the snakes from Ireland.

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Cost

There is no fee to climb this conical shaped mountain. At the base of the climb is a small stall selling walking sticks for a small fee and on descent the stick can be returned and part of the fee refunded. The walking stick is a wise purchase.

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Sights and Activities

The mountain can be climbed at most times throughout the year but the best time is during spring and summer. Good sturdy walking shoes, a rain jacket and a warm jumper/jacket are important. Some small snacks and water are also important to carry. The climb will usually take 3-5 hours round trip when walking at your own pace.

The white statue of St Patrick guards the entrance to this religious mountain and the beginning of the pilgrimage. The first part of the trek up the mountain is easy walking but the last part becomes very steep and rough rocks are scattered along the walking path. There are no water fountains or taps on the climb or at the summit so you must carry your own water. There are public toilets half way up the climb and also at the summit.

At the summit the views of the Mayo countryside, Clew Bay and its many small islands are worth the exhausting and sometimes difficult climb. The weather at the top can be very changeable – windy, cloudy and no visible views and then it clears to a fine, sunny day. The small white St Patrick’s chapel on the summit where mass is celebrated every year on Reek Sunday is a place of peace and reflection.

At the bottom of the mountain close to the car park is an interesting Visitor’s Centre which consists of a café, small museum and tourist centre. Across the road from the car park is the National Famine Monument, a sculpture of a coffin ship with skeletons draped across the sides – the saddest famine monument I saw in Ireland. Not far from this monument and within walking distance are the beautiful and peaceful Clew Bay and the remains of the Murrisk Abbey.

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Getting There

By Car

There is a car park at the base of the mountain and a small parking fee is required.

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Sleep

Contributors

as well as Utrecht (14%), Peter (5%)

Croagh Patrick Travel Helpers

This is version 7. Last edited at 9:37 on Apr 3, 14 by Utrecht. 1 article links to this page.

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