Eigg

Travel Guide Europe United Kingdom Scotland Scottish Islands Hebrides Inner Hebrides Small Isles Eigg

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Introduction

Eigg lies about 16 kilometres of the coast of Scotland amongst the Small Isles.

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Geography

The main settlement on Eigg is Cleadale, a fertile coastal plain in the north west. It is known for its quartz beach, called the "singing sands" (Tràigh a' Bhìgeil) on account of the squeaking noise it makes if walked on when dry.

The centre of the island is a moorland plateau, rising to 393 metres at An Sgurr, a dramatic stump of pitchstone, sheer on three sides. Walkers who complete the easy scramble to the top in good weather are rewarded with spectacular views all round of Mull, Coll, Muck, the Outer Hebrides, Rùm, Skye, and the mountains of Lochaber on the mainland.

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Sights and Activities

  • The Singing Sands and the beach, Laig Bay (near Cleadale, in the north of the island).
  • An Sgurr - a large crag in the southern end of the island - Eigg's highest point (393 metres).
  • Massacre Cave (a short-to-medium walk from the ferry landing) is an historic site of some significance.

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Getting There

By Boat

There are two scheduled boat services that connect Eigg with the mainland:

  • The Caledonian MacBrayne ferry MV Lochnevis sails to all four of the Small Isles from Mallaig throughout the year. It calls at Eigg once on Monday, twice on Wednesday, twice on Friday and once on Saturday during the winter; twice on Monday, once on Tuesday, twice on Thursday, once on Friday and twice on Saturday in the summer.
  • During the summer, Arisaig Marine provide wildlife sightseeing cruises/ferry services from Arisaig, about 10 miles south of Mallaig. Different islands are called at on different days, but the timetable generally allows access to the Small Isles on days when the CalMac ferry does not.

By Train

If not travelling to Mallaig or Arisaig by car, you can reach the ferries by scheduled ScotRail train service (although note that the pier at Arisaig is not as close to the railway as the pier at Mallaig).

The famous 'Deerstalker' Caledonian Sleeper provides first class (single cabin) and standard class (double cabin) sleeper and reclining seat travel between Fort William and London Euston every night except Saturday. Local trains connect to Mallaig.

If travelling by day train, travelling to Eigg from anywhere further south than Fort William is only possible without an overnight stop in Mallaig on summer Saturdays, when the early morning train from Glasgow Queen Street station connects with the second CalMac sailing to Eigg.

Travelling from Eigg to points beyond Fort William by day train is likewise only possible on summer Saturdays and Sundays, when the first CalMac sailing from Eigg connects with the train to Fort William and Glasgow Queen Street on Saturday and the Arisaig Marine ferry allows passengers adequate time to reach the station at Arisaig in order to catch the train to Fort William and Glasgow Queen Street on Sunday.

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Getting Around

It's a small island, so it's easy to walk from end to the other.
Bicycle hire is available.

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Eat/Drink

There's a tearoom near the pier at Galmisdale.

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Sleep

There are a number of guest houses, self-catering cottages and bothys, plus a basic campsite by the bay near Galmisdale.

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This is version 1. Last edited at 7:26 on Jul 6, 17 by Utrecht. 1 article links to this page.

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