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Introduction

Lleyn, often called (wrongly) the Lleyn Peninsula is a narrow peninsula stretching beyond Snowdonia, almost at a right angle to the coast of Anglesey, roughly south-west. Whereas some places on the peninsula tend to get very crowded, others are far less well known and quite as attractive.

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Geography

The road joining the city of Caernarfon and the town of Portmadog can be regarded as the mainland end of Lleyn.
At the north-east of the area are three small mountains, yr Eifl (the Rivals) These descend practically to the sea at the north. Most of the peninsula is reasonably flat, except form the small lump of Garn Fadrun; at about 1100 feet, because of the flat land around this gives stupendous views with coast to the north, west and south. There are steep cliffs in the south-west but much gentler beach approaches to the north (west of the Rivals.)

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Towns and Villages

  • Abersoch - one of the UK's best known sailing villages, though very attractive it and roads to its accompanying peninsulas tend to .be terribly crowded in the summer.
  • Aberdaron - attractive village at the far south-west of Lleyn.
  • LLanbedrog - small village with extensive sandy beach.
  • Nefyn - Small town on the north side of the peninsula. It and Morfa Nefyn are more resort-like than other places in Lleyn but have very good beaches.
  • Morfa Nefyn
  • Pyllheli - rail terminus for Aberdovey, Machynlleth and Shrewsbury. Town on the southern coast often seen as a sort of unofficial capital of Lleyn.
  • Criccieth - best known as the birth place of WWI Prime Minister David Lloyd-George, Criccieth is a town with an interesting castle ruin on the south coast of the peninsula.
  • Porthmadog - busy town at the extreme south-east of Lleyn On the main rail line from Pyllheli to Shrewsbury and terminus of the preserved Ffestiniog Railway, originally powered by horses up and gravity down!
  • Portmerion - an Italianate village close to Porthmadog -unique in the UK - designed by Sir Clough Williams- Ellis in the 1920s
  • Y Rhiw - a small hilltop village at the south-west end of Lleyn. At the bootom of the fill farthest from Aberdaron. is the National Trust house of Pla yn Rhiw, not one of the Trust's largest properties but utterly beautiful.

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Sights and Activities

  • Nant Gwrtheyrn Welsh Language and Heritage Centre - at a tiny settlement on the north coast once only accessible by boat or on foot - surrounded by industrial archaeology, this is well worth a look even if you have no desire to learn Welsh.
  • Brincir Woollen Mill

Headland Viewpoints

  • Mynydd Penarfynydd - immediately south of Rhiw - a superb headland with great walks - almost always choughs and peregrines to be seen.
  • From Pen y Sil to Mynydd Mawr (i.e. right across the far south-west of the peninsula, there are numerous headlands, some reached by roads, with outstanding views over bardsea island.

Beaches

Apart from beaches attached to towns named above, some of the best are

  • Hell's Mouth - several miles of sand between Abersoch and Rhiw, crowded on the east side, where there is a caravan side, but masses of space per head at the west.
  • Porth Ysgo - a very small but rarely crowded beach with interesting industrial archaeological surroundings a bit beyond Rhiw.
  • Porth Oer (Whistling Sands)
  • Traeth Penllech
  • Porth Towyn
  • Trefor
  • Caernarfon Airport - road sign leads to extensive sands.

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Weather

It is often possible to enjoy the fine weather while seeing the mountains of Snowdonia in the rain.

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Sleep

Contributors

as well as Utrecht (3%)

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This is version 4. Last edited at 18:40 on Oct 14, 10 by Utrecht. No articles link to this page.

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