Mexico City/Tlalpan

Travel Guide North America Mexico Mexico City Mexico City/Tlalpan

edit

Introduction

Tlalpan is a neigbourhood in Mexico City, the capital of Mexico. Tlalpan is the largest borough of Mexico City and comprises several neighbourhoods and small towns in the south of Mexico City, including Tlalpan itself, Chicalcoyotl, San Pedro Mártir, San Andres Totoltepec, Xicalco and San Miguel Ajusco. Many of these towns are now merged into the urban sprawl, but most of Tlalpan is still very much green and the southernmost parts have a clearly rural character. It is home to the Fuentes Brotantes and Bosque del Pedregal National Parks. The elevation rises towards the South, and it contains the Ajusco volcanic range with the highest peak measuring 3,937 meters above the sea level.

Tlalpan itself, formerly known as San Agustín de las Cuevas, was the first rest stop on dry land when leaving the island of Mexico City towards the South. The former causeway linking it to the city is the avenue now known as Calzada de Tlalpan. Tlalpan has been relatively prosperous throughout history, which still can be seen in its well-preserved stately colonial houses and cobblestoned streets. Nowadays, it is better known as the location of most hospitals in Mexico City and its most natural parks.

In terms of foreign tourism, Downtown Tlalpan is a barely known place, which could make it a highlight if you visit it. Overall is a quiet and safe place, with pretty colonial architecture, cobblestone streets and lots of trees.

Top

edit

Sights and Activities

The Centro Historico de Tlalpan or historical Downtown of Tlalpan is a good place to visit. You can stroll through the streets around the Plaza de la Constitucion (Zocalo).

Top

edit

Events and Festivals

Day of the Dead

Although the Day of the Dead is also celebrated in many Latin American countries except Mexico (and also in parts of Europe, Asia and Africa), the Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de los Muertos) is most intensily celebrated in Mexico where it is equal to a National Holiday. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died. The celebration takes place on November 1st and 2nd, in connection with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day (November 1) and All Souls' Day (November 2). Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed and visiting graves with these as gifts. Although it is about the Dead, it is also a celebration where eating and partying both are common as well.

Other Events and Festivals

Grito de la Independencia - September 15th is Mexican Independence Day! A massive celebration involving plenty of singing, dancing and fireworks takes place in the Zócalo. Everyone here awaits an appearance from Mexico's president who rings a bell from a central balcony of the Palacio Nacional overlooking the Zócalo. The president then shouts out the Grito de Dolores, or the Cry of Dolores which was Father Hidalgo's famous call to arms against Spanish rule in 1810.

Top

edit

Getting There

The easiest way to reach the Centro Histórico of Tlalpan is using a bus or microbús from any point North along Calzada de Tlalpan (such as Metro Pino Suárez, Metro General Anaya or Tren Ligero Estadio Azteca) or using the Metrobús along Insurgentes Sur (Metrobús Fuentes Brotantes). The bus should have a sign that reads "Tlalpan San Fernando". Ask the driver you want to go "Tlalpan Centro". As in many other places in Mexico, the area lacks of traffic signs, so it is better to ask people for directions.

The Centro Histórico of Tlalpan is easily reachable by car from central Mexico City by driving along the Calzada de Tlalpan and turning right on Miguel Hidalgo (the second street after San Fernando). Street parking is relatively plentiful (by Mexico City standards) and free. From Hidalgo, there is a public car park on the right side just after passing by the central square.

There are also RTP buses that reach most of the towns in Tlalpan all the way up to Parres. Most of these buses start from the bus station opposite to Tren Ligero Station Estadio Azteca and pass by the intersection of Calzada de Tlalpan, Viaducto Tlalpan and Insurgents Sur, which later becomes the Federal (Libre) Highway to Cuernavaca.

Top

edit

Getting Around

The Centro Historico of Tlalpan comprises an area of maybe 6 x 6 blocks bordered by Insurgentes Sur to the West, Calzada de Tlalpan to the East and San Fernando to the North. Ask for a map at the Tourist Booth in the Zocalo (main square). It is all easily walkable. Other parts of Tlalpan can be reached by RTP bus from Estadio Azteca Tren Ligero Station, taxi or car. The Metrobús along Insurgentes traverses the Pedregal, and the bus lines running along Calzada de Tlalpan, Periférico, Boulevard Picacho-Ajusco are useful to reach the main urban areas in Tlalpan.

Top

edit

Eat

  • Cafetlán. great authentic food and live acoustic music.

Top

edit

Drink

There are several cafés and bars in the arcades opposite to the main square, including a popular branch of the De la Selva café.

Top

edit

Sleep

  • Hotel Costa del Sol, Carretera Federal a Cuernavaca No. 5101 Tlalpan.
  • Radisson Paraiso, Cupside 53, Colonia Parques, ☎ +52 5927-5959. 4-star hotel. USD$ 125-150.
  • Royal Pedregal, Periferico Sur 4363, Jardines en la Montaña.

Top

edit

Keep Connected

Internet

Internet cafe's are widely available and you generally can find one in the direct vicinity. Sometimes photocopy stores or photo processing stores will double as an internet cafe with a couple of computers. Look for signs reading "Acceso a Internet" or "Cibernautica" or "Cibercafe". Charges range from approx. US$1 an hour to US$3 an hour, depending on the location.

Phone

See also International Telephone Calls

Phone cards can be purchased anywhere and are needed for the majority of public phones. To call any number outside your region you have to dial 01 then followed by the area code. If calling a cellphone from a normal phone start with with 044. If calling cellphone to cellphone just dial the 10-digit number. To make an international call dial 00 followed by the country code then the local number. To call to Mexico, also dial 00 (most of the times) followed by the national code 52.

Post

The Mexican postal service is operated by Correos de México. The post service in Mexico is pretty good although not very cheap. It is reliable regarding the sending of postcards, but it takes at least a week to send it to other countries (US/Canada), more so if you send it to Europe or Australia. For packages it is better to use international services like FedEx or UPS. If you are sending a package internationally with the Mexican postal service, take the package OPEN to the post office, they may want to inspect it. Seal it up at the post office. Post offices typically open from 8:00am to 6:00pm Monday to Friday, and 9:00am to 1:00pm Saturday. You will find post offices (Oficina de Correos) is almost any town or city in Mexico. To buy stamps it is best to go to the post office, although you can also get them at stamp machines, located outside the post offices, at bus stations, airports and some commercial establishments.

Top

Mexico City/Tlalpan Travel Helpers

We don't currently have any Travel Helpers for Mexico City/Tlalpan

This is version 4. Last edited at 13:41 on Apr 23, 19 by Utrecht. 1 article links to this page.

Creative Commons License
Except where otherwise noted, content of this article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License