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Introduction

Nelson's County, England's breadbasket, and once home to the infamous Iceni tribe, this sizeable rural county covering the north of East Anglia has plenty to offer visitors. Whether you're looking for wildlife, the bustle of the city, a day at the beach, history, traditional culture, outdoor recreation, or just to get away from it all, you're sure to find what you're looking for here.

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Geography

Much of the landscape is flat and low-lying, with the main exceptions being up in the North near areas such as Sheringham and Cromer. Fields cover vast areas of the county, and in the east, the Norfolk Broads dominate.

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Sights and Activities

Norfolk Broads, Norwich, numerous beaches (some with facilities for watersports), numerous wildlife areas and nature reserves, museums of culture and history, outdoor recreational activities such as cycling, boat-hire, hiking, etc.

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Events and Festivals

Norwich and Norfolk Festival (an annual event), village fayres held throughout the county in summer.

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Weather

The lack of variation in relief, combined with distance from the Atlantic ocean and its associated weather systems, also makes this the driest region of England, and Britain as a whole with the broads receiving a rough average of 577mm a year. The distance from the warming influence of the North Atlantic drift and Gulf Stream mean that the temperature varies more than in western areas, with average temperatures varying from 4 °C in January to 17 °C in July.

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Getting There

By Plane

There are a number of flights from other UK airports and a number from continental Europe to Norwich airport each day. Alternatively, London and it's associated airports are a little over 160 kilometres away although this distance will vary given the airport in question and Norfolk's size.

By Train

Trains run regularly from central London, Peterborough, and areas nearby, to Norwich and sometimes to places such as Great Yarmouth.

By Car

The main roads in and out of the county are the A11 (the best route from London, work to dual it and increase capacity is due to be completed by December 2014), the A140 (only really applicable if approaching from Essex or Suffolk), the A47 (runs from Leicester to Great Yarmouth, passing around Norwich), and the A17 (runs from Newark-on-Trent in the midlands to King's Lynn where it joins the A47, the main road if approaching East Anglia from the north).

By Bus

Coaches from the likes of National Express travel between Norwich and London, as well as a number of other bigger towns.

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Getting Around

By Train

Many trains travel between Norwich and bigger towns such as Great Yarmouth, Cromer, Sheringham.

By Car

With Norfolk being so rural and the lack of public transport resulting from it, this is how the vast majority of people travel. Numerous A and B roads criss-cross the area so getting where you need to is never a problem. Although if you're especially unlucky, your progress may be hindered by tractors and other farm vehicles.

By Bus

Buses mainly run around Norwich, out to its suburbs, and to a number of Park and Ride facilities that surround the city.

By Boat

On the broads it is easy enough to hire a boat for a day, a week, or a few weeks, and explore the waterways from anywhere in the area. In summer it's always popular as there are frequent stops, pubs, restaurants, and places of interest for people to moor up at.

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Eat

Country pubs and similarly traditional eateries and takeaways litter the region, although it's never difficult to find food from other cultures, especially in the bigger towns.

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Norfolk Travel Helpers

We don't currently have any Travel Helpers for Norfolk

This is version 6. Last edited at 7:27 on Aug 5, 16 by Utrecht. 5 articles link to this page.

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