Skip Navigation

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky

Photo © petralex

Travel Guide Europe Russia Far Eastern Russia Kamchatka Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky

edit

Introduction

Sun rays

Sun rays

© All Rights Reserved KamLive

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky is the main city in Kamchatka in the far east of Russia. Like many cities in the country, the number of inhabitants is declining rapidly and there are now less than 200,000 people living here. It is a port city on the Avacha Bay and surrounded by high, snow-capped mountains and volcanoes. The city is the principal entry point for travelers visiting the peninsula, and has good tourist infrastructure, offering anything from wildlife viewing to bear hunting to paragliding.

Top

edit

Sights and Activities

  • Lenin Square - the center of town is based around a statue of Lenin, nearby is a statue of Jean Francois de la Perouse who lead a round-the-world expedition which sank in 1787 en route to Japan from Petropavlovsk.
  • Nikolskaya hill - excellent views of the city and bay as well as the "Monument of Glory" erected in 1882 in honor of the heroic defense of the city, outnumbered 3-to-1, against the British/French during the Crimean War in 1854.
  • Vitus Bering monument - the oldest monument in Russia's Far East, built sometime between 1823-26 in honor of Bering, who founded the city
  • Charles Clark monument - erected by the British in 1913 in honor of Cpt. Clark who died shortly after departing Petropavolovsk during a round-the-world voyage in 1779.
  • Monument to Lt. A. Maksutov's Battery - a reconstruction of the 1854 battery which was the most crucial in the defeat of the Anglo-French siege
  • Home Volcanos are the closest to the city mountains of Avachinsky group which includes Avachinsky Volcano (2741m), Koryakskaya Sopka (3,456 metres) and Kozelsky volcano (2,190 metres). Avachinsky Volcano is common venue for annual climbing with optional MTB downhill for the crazy.
  • The Church of Holy Trinity (Храм Святой Живоначальной Троицы) (Between Prospekt 50let Oktyabrya and Zerkalnaya st). The main church of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky.
  • The Church of Saint Nikolai (Храм Святителя Николая Чудотворца). Small church close to the Trinity church.

Top

edit

Events and Festivals

On the first weekend of September the city hosts the Festival of Bard songs.

Top

edit

Weather

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky has a subarctic climate with cool winters and relatively cold winters, though not as cold as the central Siberian winters, thanks to its location near the Pacific Ocean. Summers from mid-June to mid-September see average highs in the 12-16 °C range with nights mostly around 6-9 °C. Winters from December to February have days around -5 °C and nights around -10 °C. Much of the annual 900mm of precipitation falls during the second half of the year, while March to June is the driest time of the year, with around 40-50mm a month. Snow is common in winter.

Top

edit

Getting There

By Plane

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky Airport (PKC) offers flights to Moscow, St. Petersburg, Khabarovsk, Novosibirsk, Vladivostok, Yekaterinburg, Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, Yakutsk, Magadan and seasonal charters to Tokyo (summer only).

By Car

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky is the second largest mainland city in the world that is unreachable by road from any other noticeable city, behind Iquitos in Peru. However, a handful of roads on the peninsula connect the city with its airport (in Yelizovo), and with the closed city of Vilyuchinsk.

Top

edit

Getting Around

Most things of interest within the city are located within a compact area that can be covered on foot. The central square Teatralnaya is a venue for all major city events. Out of the square are running up three main streets: Leninskaya, Sovetskaya and Partizanskaya. There are also cheap buses and minbuses operating fixed routes throughout the city, mostly along the main road (fare as at July 2011 was 16 Rubles flat fare, pay driver as you alight).

Top

Top

edit

Keep Connected

Internet

Russia is a huge country, and excess to the internet varies a lot. The main cities and tourist places have (free) wifi excess at lots of places, like restaurants and cafes (McDonald's is always a safe bet). Internet cafes are present in larger places as well. Rural areas and especially if you venture into remote and/or mountainous areas have little excess at all. Most travellers will find connections though when using their phone or tablet.

Phone

See also: International Telephone Calls

The emergency number is 112. The country code for Russia is 7. Russian phone numbers have an area code with three, four or five digits (according to their province), followed by an individual number with, respectively, 7, 6 or 5 digits, always yielding 10 digits in total. The three digit code 800 is used for toll-free calls. Mobile phones always have three-digit "area" codes and seven-digit numbers. Calls within any one area code may omit the area code (except in Moscow). Inter-area code calls within Russia: 8 (wait for tone) full Russian number including area code. The international access code for dialling outwith Russia is the sequence of 8 (wait for secondary tone and then) 10. International calls to Russia, as always, replace the plus sign (+) in the international phone format with the local international access code for the country you're calling from, followed by Russia's country code of 7 followed by the individual Russian phone number including area code.

You will require a SIM-unlocked GSM 900 / 1800 compatible international cell phone when buying a Russian SIM card. If you do not have your own international cell phone, it's best to buy a cheap cell phone with some value on the card. Foreigners can purchase a local SIM card by showing your passport. BeeLine is considered to be the best in terms of reliability and connections quality. However Megafon's services can be a bit cheaper.

Post

Russian Post is the national postal service of Russia. It's English version is currently under construction, but mainly involves the track&trace system. The domestic post is reasonably reliable, and sending international mail is fairly reliable but slow, taking at least a few weeks to European countries, longer to the USA or Australia for example. The delivery of mail sent from abroad to Russia is highly unreliable, and people or companies tend to use foreign adresses, from where a private carrier sends it to Russia. Alternatives like poste restante are non-existent with Russian Post. Most cities and large towns in Russia have a Central Post Office (Glavpochtamt), which also sells stamps and envelopes, and usually has fax services and Internet availability, though the latter mostly not in smaller places. Also, many hotels have postal services, including mail boxes. Post offices tend to keep long hours, usually from 8:00am or 9:00am until 8:00pm or 9:00pm Monday to Friday, and closing earlier during weekends. The main central post offices in the biggest cities keep even longer hours. For sending parcels, you can also try services by DHL Russia and FedEx Russia. For all mail you can use the regular alphabet, though maybe include the country's name in Cyrillic. For sending post to Russia (or trying to receive it) note that addresses should be in reverse order: Russia, postal code, city, street address, name.

Top

Accommodation in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky

We have a comprehensive list of accommodation in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky searchable right here on Travellerspoint. You can use our map to quickly compare budget, mid-range or top of the range accommodation in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and areas nearby.

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky Travel Helpers

We don't currently have any Travel Helpers for Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky

This is version 3. Last edited at 10:22 on Oct 2, 17 by Utrecht. 7 articles link to this page.

Creative Commons License
Except where otherwise noted, content of this article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License