Sambas

Travel Guide Asia Indonesia Kalimantan West kalimantan Sambas

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Introduction

Sambas has been the seat of a sultanate since about 1683 AD, when sultan Muhammad Tajuddin I moved his administrative centre to the confluence of Sambas, Teberau and Subah rivers. A visit to the Dalam Kaum is a must. That is the site where the royal palace and the mosque are located. And when you have come this way, make a pilgrimage to the grave of Bujang Nadi and Dare Nandung, a prince and princess who – according to a folk tale - were buried alive as punishment by their cruel father. The town Sambas is the capital of Sambas Regency, which includes Tanjung Dato National Park. This used to be a very remote region, but since Paloh River has been bridged one can drive 100 kilometres to Temajuk village. There one can arrange a hiking trip in the park and to Cape Dato, the most northerly point. Between Paloh River and Temajuk lies Indonesia's longest sandy beach, 42 kilometres, now fast becoming a popular destination.

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Sights and Activities

Sultan's Palace

Sultan's Palace

© theo1006

  • Istane Alwatzikhoebillah (sultan's palace) - Built of wood from 1933 to 1935 adjacent to the mosque in the heritage area Dalam Kaum on the waterfront. It consists of three parts: the main dwelling in the centre and two smaller houses symmetrically on each side. Entry to the main house is free, the descendants of the dynasty live elsewhere. The last inheritor of the title, Pangeran Ratu H. Winata Kesuma, died in his 30s and his son is still a minor. Best time to visit is July 15th, when they celebrate a ceremony in honour of the prince.
  • Jami' Mosque - The mosque, Masjid Jami' dates back to AD 1885 when it was built on the order of Sultan Muhammad Syafi'oeddin II. He reigned for 56 years and is credited with establishing schools, roads and bridges as well as irrigation canals. There is a ship's mast in the front yard of mosque and palace, that served as a landmark for boats coming home.
  • Sebedang Lake - A recreational area, formerly a bathing place for the sultan and his family. Now locals come here for bathing, boating and karaoke. A Chinese cemetery covers the hills on the far side of the lake. Warung Dangau Duduk Bersela serves a good fish dinner. Address: Sebawi district, Sambas regency. Directions: On the main road direction Singkawang, at 18.3 kilometres south of Hotel Pantura Jaya.
Bujang Nadi and Dare Nandung's grave

Bujang Nadi and Dare Nandung's grave

© theo1006

  • Bujang Nadi and Dare Nandung's grave - 700 metres south of the turnoff to Sebedang Lake, on the other side of the road, a sort walk or ride leads to the grave of Bujang Nadi and Dare Nandung, a prince and princess who - according to a folk tale - were buried alive as punishment by their cruel father. Their crime? Saying to each other as brother and sister that they would only want a spouse similar to each other.

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Getting There

By Car

There are bus and 'travel' services between Pontianak, Singkawang and Sambas. A 'travel' is a minibus or station car picking up passengers at scheduled times.

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Eat

Pondok Sambas - Open dining space, also the clean kitchen is open for all to see. Varied and creative menu, e.g. fu-yung-hai served in crab shells. Address: Jalan A. Yani, 2 kilometres south of Hotel Pantura Jaya, on the left side of the road.

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Sleep

Hotel Pantura Jaya - So far the only hotel in Sambas, with garden and pool. Buffet breakfast with choice of nasi and mie. WiFi in the room works off and on. Address: Jalan Tabrani 62A, Sambas, Kalimantan Barat 79411 (a couple of kilometres from town centre, on the main drive coming up from the south). Phone: 0562-393265.

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Keep Connected

Internet

Internet is becoming more widely used in Indonesia, and warung Internet (warnet) - Internet cafés - are emerging everywhere. A lot of restaurants and cafés in big cities normally have wireless internet available for free. Internet connection speed in Indonesia varies between ISP and location. Prices vary considerably, and as usual you tend to get what you pay for, but you'll usually be looking at around Rp3,000 to Rp5,000 per hour with faster access than from your own mobile phone. In large cities, there are free WiFi hotspots in many shopping malls, McDonald restaurants, Starbucks cafes, 7 Eleven convenience stores, and in some restaurants and bars. Some hotels provide free hotspots in the lobby and/or in their restaurants and even in your rooms.

Phone

See also: International Telephone Calls

You can use 112 as an emergency number through mobile phones. Other numbers include 110 (police), 113 (fire) and 118 (ambulance).
The international phone code is 62.

If you have GSM cellular phone, ask your local provider about "roaming agreement/facility" with local GSM operators in Indonesia (i.e.: PT Indosat, PT Telkomsel, PT XL Axiata). The cheapest way is buying a local SIM card, which would be much cheaper to call and especially use internet compared to your own cell phone's sim card.

The Indonesian mobile phone market is heavily competitive and prices are low: you can pick up a prepaid SIM card for less than Rp 10,000 and calls may cost as little as Rp 300 a minute to some other countries using certain carriers (subject to the usual host of restrictions). SMS (text message) service is generally very cheap, with local SMS as low as Rp129-165, and international SMS for Rp400-600. Indonesia is also the world's largest market for used phones, and basic models start from Rp 150,000, with used ones being even cheaper.

Post

Pos Indonesia provides the postal service in Indonesia. Pos Indonesia is government-owned and offers services ranging from sending letters and packages to money transfers (usually to remote areas which have no bank branch/ATM nearby) and selling postcards and stamps. Sending a postcards, letter or parcel is relatively expensive, but fairly reliable. It takes several days at least to send it within Indonesia, at least a week internationally. It is recommended to send letters from a Pos Indonesia branch, not by putting it inside orange mailbox (called Bis Surat) in the roadside, because some of the mailboxes are in very bad condition and aren't checked regularly by Pos Indonesia. Opening times of post offices usually tend to follow general business hours: Monday to Friday from 8:00am to 4:00pm (sometimes shorter hours on Fridays), Saturdays from 8:00am to 1:00pm, closed on Sundays. Bigger cities, tourist areas and central post offices tend to keep longer hours, into the evenings.

Private postal services based in Indonesia include CV Titipan Kilat (CV TIKI), Jalur Nugraha Ekaputra (JNE), Caraka, and RPX. There are also foreign postal services that have branches in Indonesia, including DHL, TNT, UPS, and FedEx.

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This is version 14. Last edited at 8:50 on Mar 5, 18 by Utrecht. 2 articles link to this page.

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