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Introduction

Torreón is a city and seat of Torreón Municipality in the Mexican state of Coahuila. As of 2015, the city's population was 679,288. The metropolitan population as of 2015 was 1,497,734, making it the ninth-biggest metropolitan area in the country and the largest metropolitan area in state of Coahuila, as well as one of Mexico's most important economic and industrial centers. The cities of Torreón, Gómez Palacio, Lerdo, Matamoros, Francisco I. Madero, San Pedro, Bermejillo, and Tlahualilo form the area of La Laguna or the Comarca Lagunera, a basin within the Chihuahuan Desert.

The area was originally a center for ranching. With irrigation the city became an important center for farming and the processing of cotton. In the middle of the 20th century, it became an industrial city. The city has industries in textiles, clothing and metals processing. Some important industries and companies have business here, like Peñoles, Motores John Deere, Grupo Lala, Yura Corporation, as well as stores like Soriana, Cimaco, and Extra. There are also several shopping malls in the city, including Galerias Laguna, Plaza Cuatro Caminos and InterMall.

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Sights and Activities

  • The Christ of the Noas (El Cristo de las Noas): a sculpture on top of a hill, with a church and shrines related to the Holy Land. This sculpture is the third largest in Latin America after the one Rio de Janeiro in Brazil and the Cristo de la Concordia in Bolivia. Christ is shown with open arms, as if giving a big hug, symbolizing protection for the city. It has an excellent panorama, much of the city is observed. At Holy Week it is visited by many local and foreign people.
  • The Pearl Channel (El Canal de la Perla): This channel was built in the late 19th century as an irrigation canal bypassing the waters of Nazas river to irrigate the south east of the city. It is used as an underpass by the population in addition to temporary art exhibitions and demonstrations art.
  • The Historic Center (Centro Histórico) is made up of several churches and cathedrals as well as government and administrative offices.
  • Arocena Museum, (Museo Arocena) has on display art collections from the pre-Hispanic times to the present. This museum also has a section dedicated to Mexico's and Torreón's history. There are also temporal expositions, conferences, book fairs, movies, and activities for children.
  • Museo Regional de la Laguna has many interesting archaeological displays on pre-colonial desert cultures of Northern Mexico as well as other cultures from around the nation.
  • Museu de la Revolución chronicles several battles for the city of Torreón during the Mexican Revolution, with the escapades of Pancho Villa being a highlight of the exhibits.

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Events and Festivals

Day of the Dead

Although the Day of the Dead is also celebrated in many Latin American countries except Mexico (and also in parts of Europe, Asia and Africa), the Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de los Muertos) is most intensily celebrated in Mexico where it is equal to a National Holiday. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died. The celebration takes place on November 1st and 2nd, in connection with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day (November 1) and All Souls' Day (November 2). Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed and visiting graves with these as gifts. Although it is about the Dead, it is also a celebration where eating and partying both are common as well.

Other Events and Festivals

  • Grito de la Independencia - September 15th is Mexican Independence Day! A massive celebration involving plenty of singing, dancing and fireworks takes place in the Zócalo. Everyone here awaits an appearance from Mexico's president who rings a bell from a central balcony of the Palacio Nacional overlooking the Zócalo. The president then shouts out the Grito de Dolores, or the Cry of Dolores which was Father Hidalgo's famous call to arms against Spanish rule in 1810.
  • Dia de la Candelaria. Candlemas is held February 2nd and commemorates Jesus being introduced into the temple 40 days after his birth. This nationwide celebration sees many different ways of celebrating with many towns holding processions, bullfights and dances. Of course, plenty of delicious, traditional foods are served during Dia de la Candelaria as well.
  • Carnaval is held in late February or early March throughout Mexico. This big party is meant to celebrate the 40 day penance of Lent. Carnaval always takes place during the week or so prior to Ash Wednesday, 46 days before Easter Sunday. Mexicans celebrate this holiday with fireworks, food, dancing, parades and drinking.
  • Semana Santa, or Holy Week, is a huge celebration which starts on Palm Sunday. This is a very popular time for Mexicans to take a short break; as a result, it seems most of the country is on the move, with buses and hotels often booked out. As for the celebration of Semana Santa, expect colorful processions and many masses at churches everywhere.
  • Día de Nuestra Seňora de Guadalupe, or Day of our Lady of Guadalupe, is held December 12th. There is a week-long build up to this religious celebration in honour of the Virgin who appeared to the indigenous Juan Diego in the year 1531. Since then, the Lady of Guadalupe has been Mexico's religious patron and her veneration is very significant. It is traditional for young boys to be dressed as a Juan Diego and for young girls to be dressed in indigenous garb and brought to a special mass, held at many churches throughout the country.
  • The Cotton and Grape Festival. The main annual festival in Torreón is the Cotton and Grape Fair (Feria del Algodón y La Uva) which takes place each September. It contains cultural events, music, food and amusement rides.

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Weather

The city features a desert climate (in the Köppen climate classification BWh). Rainfall is scarce but more prominent in the summer, while temperatures are very hot by day and cool at night, although the urban heat island effect causes temperatures on summer nights to be considerably warmer than nearby areas. Flora and fauna are those common to semidesert habitats. The months with the most amount of precipitation are June, July and August, averaging, 34.9,mm 24.2 mm and 26.5 mm, respectively. The hottest months are April through August, when temperatures can reach upwards of 36 °C.

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Getting There

By Plane

Francisco Sarabia International Airport (IATA: TRC, ICAO: MMTC), also known as Torreón International Airport, is an international airport located in Torreón. It handles the national and international air traffic of the Comarca Lagunera, including Gómez Palacio and Lerdo in the state of Durango. Other major destinations include Mexico City, Ciudad Juarez, Guadalajara, Hermosillo, Santiago de Queretaro, Cancún and Tijuana.

By Car

You can acces to Torreón by several federal and state highways. Some of the most important are:

  • México 30 - Known as the Carretera Torreón-San Pedro (Torreon-San Pedro Highway) connects with San Pedro de las Colonias and Monclova.
  • México 40 - Known as El Periférico (The Peripheral). It connects with Saltillo (to the East); and Gomez Palacio and Lerdo in the State of Durango (to the West)
  • México 40D - Known as Libramineto Laguna Norte (North Laguna Beltway). It is a toll highway that surrounds the city. It connects with the same cities as the Mexico 40 but it is much faster and safer.

By Bus

Torreon has a Bus Central (Central Camionera) with destinations to several cities in Mexico and the United States. Destinations to and from include: Chihuahua, Cuatro Cienegas, Victoria de Durango, Parras, Saltillo and Zacatecas.

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Getting Around

By Car

The best way to move around is by car, there are several car rental agencies and they are easy to get in the hotels and in the airport.

By Public Transport

Intra-city buses ply nearly every main street in the city and are cheap; expect to pay a few pesos for any route. Major points along the way of each route - markets, plazas, malls, hospitals and so on - will be displayed in the front window of the bus. Most people wait for their bus at designated stops but it is often possible to flag down a bus anywhere.

By Foot

In the center of the city it is common to walk to avoid traffic and finding parking spaces.

By Bike

Another good way to get around is by bicycle. Torreon is in a semi-desert area and it may be hot, so it is recommended to do it in the evening or early in the morning.

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Eat

  • Los Farloitos (The Little Lanterns): It is a local franchise which serves tacos, flautas and tostadas among other Mexican dishes. You can find it in different parts of the city.
  • El Pueblito (The Little Village): Also known as the "OK Maguey" is a restaruant decorated as a a Mexican village, which also has traditional Mexican food among different cuts of beef. This restaurant is on the Constitution Boulevard (Bulevar Constitución)
  • El Pinabete (The Pinabete, a "pinabete" is a kind of tree that grows on the region): This restaurant serves mainly fish and seafood. It is on the Independence Boulevard in front of a Wal-Mart.
  • Encomenderos (doesn't has a translation, it is a word game that mixes the words comer which means "eat" and encomendar which means "entrust"): This is a restaurant mainly dedicated to serve tacos.
  • El Tacotote (The Big Taco): in the Independence Boulevard, it is a restaurant which serves big tacos.
  • El Taco con Botas (The Taco in Boots, a word game for The Puss in Boots): It is also a local franchise which serves very good tacos.

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Sleep

  • Hotel Calvete, Calle Ramón Corona 320 Sur, Primero de Cobián Centro, ☎ +52 871 716 1010. This mid-range accommodation option has 8 storeys of bright rooms, all with balcony. There is an on-site restaurant. Rooms start at M$600.
  • Hotel Río Nazas, Av Morelos 732, Primero de Cobián Centro, ☎ +52 871 711 1347. A garish building in the center of Torreón, the Rio Nazas surprises with modern rooms, luxury bathrooms and a grand lobby complete with a bubbling fountain.
  • Fiesta Inn, Periferico Raul Lopez Sanchez 6000, Residencial el Fresno, next to the Galerías Laguna Mall, ☎ +52 871 749 3300. This chain hotel is one of the most modern in the city. There is an outdoor swimming pool and a restaurant on-site.
  • El Fresno Galerías, Blvd. Independencia #3851 Ote. Col, Residencial el Fresno, ☎ +52 871 750 9888. This upscale hotel has rater dated rooms. There is a nice outdoor pool here.
  • Holiday Inn Express
  • Crowne Plaza, Blvd. Torreon-matamoros : 4050, Col.ex-hacienda Antigua Los Angeles, 27260 Torreón, ☎ +52 871 729 9600, toll-free: 01 800 000 04 04. Considered the most luxurious hotel in town, the Crowne Plaza offers a comfortable place to stay with a lot of amenities and a modern building. M$1,462 per night.

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Keep Connected

Internet

There are internet cafe's in most cities and towns in Mexico. Sometimes photocopy stores or photo processing stores will double as an internet cafe with a couple of computers. Look for signs reading "Acceso a Internet" or "Cibernautica" or "Cibercafe". Charges range from approx. US$1 an hour to US$3 an hour, depending on the location.

Phone

See also International Telephone Calls

Phone cards can be purchased anywhere in the country and are needed for the majority of public phones. To call any number outside your region you have to dial 01 then followed by the area code. If calling a cellphone from a normal phone start with with 044. If calling cellphone to cellphone just dial the 10-digit number. To make an international call dial 00 followed by the country code then the local number. To call to Mexico, also dial 00 (most of the times) followed by the national code 52.

Post

The Mexican postal service is operated by Correos de México. The post service in Mexico is pretty good although not very cheap. It is reliable regarding the sending of postcards, but it takes at least a week to send it to other countries (US/Canada), more so if you send it to Europe or Australia. For packages it is better to use international services like FedEx or UPS. If you are sending a package internationally with the Mexican postal service, take the package OPEN to the post office, they may want to inspect it. Seal it up at the post office. Post offices typically open from 8:00am to 6:00pm Monday to Friday, and 9:00am to 1:00pm Saturday. You will find post offices (Oficina de Correos) is almost any town or city in Mexico, and some are actually very pretty buildings. To buy stamps it is best to go to the post office, although you can also get them at stamp machines, located outside the post offices, at bus stations, airports and some commercial establishments.

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Torreón Travel Helpers

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This is version 10. Last edited at 14:52 on May 8, 19 by Utrecht. 4 articles link to this page.

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