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Introduction

Youngstown is located on the Mahoning River, approximately 65 miles southeast of Cleveland and 61 miles northwest of Pittsburgh. Despite having its own media market, Youngstown is often included in commercial and cultural depictions of both Northeast Ohio as well as the Greater Pittsburgh Region due to these proximities. Youngstown is also the midway between New York City and Chicago via Interstate 80.

The city was named for John Young, an early settler from Whitestown, New York, who established the community's first sawmill and gristmill. Youngstown is in a region of America that is often referred to as the Rust Belt. Traditionally known as a center of steel production, Youngstown was forced to redefine itself when the U.S. steel industry fell into decline in the 1970s, leaving communities throughout the region without major industry. The city has experienced a decline of over 60% of its population since 1959. Youngstown also falls within the Appalachian Ohio region, among the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains.

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Neighbourhoods

  • Downtown Youngstown is the traditional center of the city. After decades of precipitous decline, the downtown area shows signs of renewal. Civic leaders have expressed hope that the district will emerge as a significant arts and entertainment district within the Youngstown-Warren metropolitan area. Downtown Youngstown is the site of most of the city's government buildings and banks. A number of entertainment venues are also located in the downtown, including the Covelli Centre, Powers Auditorium (the original Warner Bros. Theatre), the DeYor Performing Arts Center, and Oakland Centers for the Performing Arts. In addition, the downtown sits to the immediate south of notable cultural and educational resources, including Youngstown State University, the Butler Institute of American Art, and the McDonough Museum of Contemporary Art.
  • Brier Hill is a neighborhood that was once viewed as the city's "Little Italy" district. The neighborhood, which was the site of the city's first Italian settlement, stretches along the western edge of Youngstown's lower north side and encircles St. Anthony's Church, an Italian-American Roman Catholic parish. Each year, at the end of August, the Brier Hill Fest attracts thousands of visitors from Northeast Ohio and Western Pennsylvania.
  • Brownlee Woods. This neighborhood is bordered by the City of Struthers to the east, Interstate 680 to the west, Boardman Township to the south, and Midlothian Blvd to the north. Brownlee Woods was named after the Brownlee family who were prosperous agriculturalists, politicians, and businessmen. The neighborhood is located near Paul C. Bunn Elementary School, and also contains a playground, the Brownlee Woods Library, and churches. Most of the homes are single-family housing that are owned.
  • Fosterville is a neighborhood that is located on the south-southwestern side of the city. In the course of a recent revitalization effort, called "Youngstown 2010", the original Fosterville neighborhood has been subdivided into two distinct neighborhood areas: Idora and Warren. The neighborhood converted from farmland to residential housing in the early 1900s. This occurred due to the introduction of the new South Side trolley-car line in 1899 (owned by the Youngstown Park and Falls Street Railway Company). The line ran out of downtown Youngstown to the South Side's Fosterville neighborhood near Mill Creek Park and Lanterman's Mill. People were encouraged to use the new trolley line when the railway company built an amusement park (opening 1899) at end of the trolley line.
  • Hazelton (also spelled Haselton) is a neighborhood that is located on the city's east side. It is bordered by the cities of Struthers and Campbell. In the early 20th century, the district was alternately referred to as "the East End." Hazelton overlooked the many blast furnaces that operated along the banks of the Mahoning River. These included the Haselton Iron Works Mill and Republic Steel's Youngstown mill. Today, the vacant remains of some of these plants can still be seen along the river. The neighborhood was originally named after the Haseltine family, who owned land in the district. The neighborhood was renamed by later inhabitants who favored a name that made the district seem like a town. Hazelton's population expanded with the growth of the mills, and it became the home of thousands of immigrants from England, Germany, Ireland, Italy, and Eastern Europe. The district's African-American population grew steadily in the post-World War II era.
  • Lansingville is a traditional neighborhood in Youngstown. Located on the city's south side, the area was named for John Lansing. The neighborhood was dominated by Slovak Americans, the majority of whom were Roman Catholic, during much of the 20th century. The Lansingville neighborhood developed rapidly with the expansion of the city's south side in the late 19th century and early 20th century. The district's growth was made possible by the construction of the Market Street Bridge, which connected the south side to downtown Youngstown. Immigrants began to settle in the area during the late 19th century, and Lansingville was incorporated into Youngstown during the 1880s. While the Lansingville neighborhood drew European immigrants of various backgrounds, including German Americans and Italian Americans, Slovak Americans became the dominant group in the early 20th century. One of the neighborhood's prominent landmarks is St. Matthias Church, which was established by Slovak immigrants who originally belonged to Sts. Cyril and Methodius Church, in the Smoky Hollow area of Youngstown.
  • North Heights is a neighborhood in Youngstown located on the city's upper North Side. The neighborhood's name derives from the fact that it sits at a higher elevation than the Wick Park District, Youngstown State University, and Downtown Youngstown. The neighborhood is bordered on the north by Liberty Township, with Gypsy Lane marking the city limit (the Gypsy Line); Belmont Avenue to the west; Redondo Road and Crandall Park to the south; and Fifth Avenue to the east. North Heights comprises a mixture of modestly scaled and larger homes. Residents of the neighborhood include African Americans, Italian Americans, Irish Americans, and Jewish Americans of various ethnic backgrounds. North Heights' traditionally large Jewish population is reflected by the presence in the neighborhood of institutions such as Heritage Homes and Levi Gardens, housing for Jewish senior citizens, the Youngstown Jewish Community Center, Noah's Park, and Akiva Academy. The neighborhood's origins as a development that featured good examples of Spanish Colonial Revival-style architecture is evident in street names such as Carlotta, Granada, Goleta, and Madera.

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Sights and Activities

  • Covelli Centre is a multi-purpose arena. It opened in 2005, thanks in a large part to a $26 million redevelopment grant secured in 2000 by Congressman James A. Traficant, Jr. It is home to the Youngstown Phantoms of the United States Hockey League. The Covelli Centre was previously known as the Chevrolet Centre and is nicknamed "The Chevy Centre" or "The Convo" by some in the area from its former names. The arena's grand opening was on October 29, 2005, when it hosted a concert by 3 Doors Down. The first hockey game was played about a week later, on November 4.
  • Powers Auditorium is one of the largest auditoriums in the Youngstown-Warren area. The facility is the main venue of downtown Youngstown's DeYor Performing Arts Center. The complex also includes the Adler Art Academy, Beecher Flad Pavilion, and Ford Family Recital Hall. Originally built in 1931 as the Warner Theatre, the former movie palace was renovated and reopened as Powers Auditorium in 1969. The main tenant of Powers Auditorium is the Youngstown Symphony, which performs from October through May. The facility also hosts other musical acts, touring Broadway productions, and locally produced theater (primarily from Ballet Western Reserve and Easy Street Productions, two Youngstown-based theater companies).
  • The Butler Institute of American Art, located on Wick Avenue, was the first museum dedicated exclusively to American art. Established by local industrialist and philanthropist Joseph G. Butler, Jr., the museum has been operating pro bono since 1919. Dedicated in 1919, the original structure is a McKim, Mead and White architectural masterpiece listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Youngstown Historical Center of Industry and Labor, preserves the history of the steel industry that dominated the Youngstown area's economic life for much of the 20th century. The museum is owned by the Ohio Historical Society and operated by Youngstown State University. The facility, which was designed by noted architect Michael Graves, is reminiscent of a steel mill, complete with stylized smoke stacks. A museum to commemorate the community's declining steel industry was first proposed by Ohio State Senator Harry Meshel in 1977, and a planning office was opened in downtown Youngstown the following year. In 1983, $3 million in state funding was approved for the project. A groundbreaking ceremony was held in 1986. The center opened with temporary exhibits in 1990, and established a permanent collection in 1992.
  • Mill Creek Park (officially known as Mill Creek MetroParks) is a metropolitan park located in Youngstown, Ohio. The Trust for Public Land ranks one part of Mill Creek as the 142nd largest park located within the limits of a US city. Mill Creek MetroParks now stretches from the near west side of Youngstown to the southern borders of the city and neighboring Boardman township. The park encompasses approximately 4400 acres, 20 mi of drives, and 15 mi of foot trails as well as a variety of bridges, ponds, streams, well-tended gardens, and waterfalls. If including the total size of the park system, Mill Creek ranks among the largest metropolitan-owned parks within the city limits of any US city.
  • McDonough Museum of Art is a center for contemporary art located on the campus of Youngstown State University (YSU). Opened in 1991 in a building designed by Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects, the museum focuses on contemporary art through exhibits and art education. The origins of the museum begin in 1986 through the donations and efforts of local physician and art collector John J. McDonough, who used proceeds from the sale of his painting Gloucester Harbor by Childe Hassam to fund construction. The museum features changing exhibitions, installations, performances, and lectures by regional, national and international artists, and also functions as public outreach for the YSU College of Fine and Performing Arts and the Department of Art, exhibiting work by students, faculty and alumni. In addition the museum offers free lectures, performances, and programs organized in collaboration with various departments at the university and the Youngstown community at large.

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Events and Festivals

Holidays

  • New Year’s Eve - The US celebrates the outgoing of the old year and incoming of the New Year quite dramatically. Every state boasts its own parties to ring in the New Year, but none is more extravagant than New York’s Time Square, which sees people overflowing into the neighboring restaurants, bars, parks, beaches, and neighborhoods.
  • Martin Luther King Jr. Day (officially Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. and sometimes referred to as MLK Day) is an American federal holiday marking the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. It is observed on the third Monday of January each year, which is around King's birthday, January 15. The holiday is similar to holidays set under the Uniform Monday Holiday Act. The earliest Monday for this holiday is January 15 and the latest is January 21. King was the chief spokesperson for nonviolent activism in the Civil Rights Movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law.
  • St Patrick’s Day - March 17 celebrates the US’s large Irish population. Many cities around the country boast boisterous parades and Irish-themed parties, especially New York and Chicago, where the river is dyed green. Be wary of the drunkenness that dominates as this is definitely a party-day.
  • Memorial Day - Memorial Day is an important holiday throughout the United States, but not for crazy festivities. Parades commemorating wartime heroes are often held and the day is also the ‘unofficial’ start of summer. Most visitors follow the crowds to parks and beaches, which are capped off with informal BBQs.
  • Independence Day - Also known as the Fourth of July, Independence Day celebrates the US’s break from the British during the 18th century. Barbecues, street parties, beach trips, and weekend getaways are commonplace to appreciate freedom.
  • Labor Day is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, laws, and well-being of the country. It is the Monday of the long weekend known as Labor Day Weekend. It is recognized as a federal holiday. Beginning in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, trade unionists proposed that a day be set aside to celebrate labor.
  • Halloween - Halloween is a fun holiday on October 31 for all generations to dress up in costumes and relive their youth. Children walk around the neighborhood trick-or-treating for candy, while adults attend parties. Other seasonal events include haunted houses, pumpkin farms and carving, and corn mazes.
  • Thanksgiving - On the fourth Thursday in November, Thanksgiving is held in almost every home in the US. Tourists will have a hard time finding anything to do as the country essentially shuts down in observation. A typical Thanksgiving meal consists of turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and pumpkin pie commemorating the original Pilgrim’s feast at Plymouth Rock.
  • Christmas - On December 25, Christians celebrate Christmas as the pinnacle of their calendar by attending church and opening gifts from Santa Claus. Almost everything shuts down to promote family togetherness. The northern regions hope to experience a “white Christmas,” with trees and festive lights blanketed by snow.

Sport

  • Super Bowl Sunday - the world’s most watched sporting event and one of the highest grossing TV days of the year, Superbowl Sunday is a spectacular extravaganza. Held the first Sunday in February, the Superbowl is the final playoff game between the NFL’s top two teams. The venue rotates every year around America, yet the local parties seem to remain. Pubs, bars and restaurants are great places to enjoy the Superbowl or locals throw their own parties with different variations of betting.
  • The World Series is the annual championship series of Major League Baseball (MLB) in North America, contested since 1903 between the American League (AL) champion team and the National League (NL) champion team. The winner of the World Series championship is determined through a best-of-seven playoff, and the winning team is awarded the Commissioner's Trophy. As the series is played during the fall season in North America, it is sometimes referred to as the Fall Classic.

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Weather

Youngstown has a humid continental climate (Köppen Dfb), typical of the Midwest, with four distinct seasons. Winters are cold and dry but typically bring a mix of rain, sleet, and snow with occasional heavy snowfall and icing. January is the coldest month with an average mean temperature of 25.8 °F with temperatures on average dropping to or below 0 °F on 4.1 days and staying at or below freezing on 43 days per year. Snowfall averages 62.7 inches per season. The snowiest month on record was 53.1 inches in December 2010, while winter snowfall amounts have ranged from 118.7 inches in 2010–11 to 25.2 inches in 1948–49. Springs generally see a transition to fewer weather systems that produce heavier rainfall. Summers are typically very warm and humid with temperatures exceeding 90 °F on 7.7 days per year on average; the annual count has been as high as 40 days in 1943, while the most recent year to not reach that mark is 2014. July is the warmest month with an average mean temperature of 70.5 °F. Autumn is relatively dry with many clear warm days and cool nights.

The all-time record high temperature in Youngstown of 103 °F (39 °C) was established on July 10, 1936, which occurred during the Dust Bowl, and the all-time record low temperature of -22 °F was set on January 19, 1994. The first and last freezes of the season on average fall on October 10 and May 6, respectively, allowing a growing season of 156 days; freezing temperatures have been observed in every month except July.[44] The normal annual mean temperature is 49.0 °F. Normal yearly precipitation based on the 30-year average from 1981–2010 is 38.91 inches, falling on an average 160 days. Monthly precipitation has ranged from 10.66 inches in June 1986 to 0.16 in (4.1 mm) in October 1924, while for annual precipitation the historical range is 54.01 inches in 2011 to 23.79 inches in 1963.

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Getting There

By Plane

Youngstown–Warren Regional Airport (IATA: YNG, ICAO: KYNG, FAA LID: YNG) is a public and military airport in Vienna Township, Trumbull County, Ohio, 11 miles north of Youngstown and 10 miles east of Warren. The airport is home to the Youngstown–Warren Air Reserve Station.

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Getting Around

By Public Transport

The Western Reserve Transit Authority is the operator of mass transportation in Mahoning County, Ohio. Service is provided throughout metropolitan Youngstown via fifteen fixed routes. These routes operate six days per week, and they are consolidated to provide daily night service. The agency also operates the shuttle system at Youngstown State University.

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Keep Connected

Internet

There is a very small internet bar/cafe culture in the USA. Even then most of the internet bars/cafes tend be located in major urban centers. Accessible WiFi networks, however, are common. The most generally useful WiFi spots are in coffee shops, fast-food chains, and bookshops, but also restaurants and hotels more and more have a network to connect on. Some of them might require you to buy something and you might need a password too, especially in hotels.

Phone

See also International Telephone Calls

The general emergency phone number is 911. The USA has a great landline phone system that is easy to use. The country code for the U.S. is +1. The rest of the telephone number consists of 10 digits: a 3-digit area code, and a 7-digit number. Any small grocery store or pharmacy has pre paid domestic or international phone cards. These phone cards are very cheap and offer good rates. The once ubiquitous pay phone is now much harder to find. Likely locations include in or near stores and restaurants, and near bus stops. The cellphone network in the states is slowly getting better but is still not as good when compared to other western countries. Cell phones tend to operate using different frequencies (850 MHz and 1900 MHz) from those used elsewhere in the world (2100 MHz). This used to prevent most foreign phones from working in America. Phones must be tri- or quad-band to work in the U.S. Fortunately, technology has meant that most phones should now be able to pick up one of the U.S. networks. Prepaid phones and top-up cards can be purchased at mobile phone boutiques and at many discount, electronics, office supply and convenience stores. A very basic handset with some credit can be had for under $40.

Post

The US Postal Service is a very good and well priced mail system. There are post offices in every small and large town for sending packages internationally or domestically. Although some might keep longer hours, most are open at least between 9:00am and 5:00pm. If wanting to send a letter or postcard it is best just to leave it in a blue mail box with the proper postage. First-class international airmail postcards and letters (up 28.5 grams) cost $1.10. There are also private postal services like FedEx, UPS, TNT and DHL, which might be better value sometimes and are generally very quick and reliable too.

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This is version 4. Last edited at 13:19 on May 23, 19 by road to roam. 1 article links to this page.

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